Download - Bitcoin

Want to Buy Bitcoins with Cash? Ripple Now Supports Cash Deposits Via Zip Zap

Want to Buy Bitcoins with Cash? Ripple Now Supports Cash Deposits Via Zip Zap submitted by CoinGuy69 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

ZAPPED CRACKED REUPLOADED (original got copyright striked)

Hey ineffable or skrt, you’re not gonna take this one down ;)
Credit ZappedFreeWeekend
“About: This is a crack of zapped.cc, the garbage paste by two pasting 14 year olds. After reverse engineering this shitty cheat, we can say without a doubt that this cheat is a pasted compilation of unknowncheats sloppy code. They appear to use the vftable hooker from CSGOSimple as the assets are 1:1. This is one of the most dispicable products and now that they are offering lifetime in exchange for skins/bitcoins, you should know they are probably exit scamming.
The cheat is god awful and there are some hilarious bugs. Some of the known bugs are:
If you swap weapon too fast or hold click while changing weapons and the aimbot is active on a player, it will get stuck Bunnyhop often misses Knife animations are laggy for no reason Anti-Aim often flicks to expose your real head and can get stuck this way Autowall is extremely broken and will shoot at nothing A LOT FPS drops out of nowhere are MASSIVE And much much more, we could not be bothered to use this garbage more than that.
Instructions: 1. Download the DLL file of the crack 2. Ensure that you have www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=48145 or a later version already installed 3. Open CS:GO 4. Inject into your game using any injector of your own choosing. 5. Enjoy the laughter associated from using this pasted garbage!”
Do you want to download the crack? Here’s a fuck ton of mirrors I uploaded from the original file the cracker posted. The 7z is slightly more compressed, i added it to avoid the hosts striking based on the hash. Because there’s no way he’s gonna strike all of these. Be warned, the crack sucks. It was a “hey fucktards i cracked your cheat” not a “hey guys download this free cheat i cracked!!”.
share.dmca.gripe/mdZv2LGE1W6flt7f.zip
anonfile.com/xec6M81bof/ZAPPED.CC_CRACKED_7z
anonfile.com/19ceM617o2/ZAPPED.CC_CRACKED_zip
anonfile.com/Bac1M219o7/ZAPPED.CC_CRACKED_7z
anonfile.com/L7ccM41bo5/ZAPPED.CC_CRACKED_zip
anonfile.com/j5d7M218o3/ZAPPED.CC_CRACKED_7z
anonfile.com/x0d4M01fo7/ZAPPED.CC_CRACKED_zip
anonfile.com/5dd0M214od/ZAPPED.CC_CRACKED_zip
anonfile.com/L6d7M214ob/ZAPPED.CC_CRACKED_zip
anonfile.com/P2daMd10oe/ZAPPED.CC_CRACKED_7z
anonfile.com/h4ecM81bo1/ZAPPED.CC_CRACKED_7z
vshare.is/P5c2M015o8/ZAPPED.CC_CRACKED_7z
vshare.is/T4c5Md10od/ZAPPED.CC_CRACKED_zip
vshare.is/b6daM81eo1/ZAPPED.CC_CRACKED_7z
vshare.is/dbd6M411o4/ZAPPED.CC_CRACKED_zip
vshare.is/ped3Ma10o5/ZAPPED.CC_CRACKED_7z
vshare.is/XfdfMb12o0/ZAPPED.CC_CRACKED_zip
vshare.is/Z1d3M31eo0/ZAPPED.CC_CRACKED_7z
vshare.is/b0e2M31ao4/ZAPPED.CC_CRACKED_zip
files.catbox.moe/78zgms.zip
files.catbox.moe/a9nzpv.7z
mirrorace.com/m/1D0a9
mirrorace.com/m/1D0aa
Try all of these. One of them will certainly be still working.
And finally, do me a favor and copy paste this whole post into the comments. They can strike one post, no way they’ll strike every comment. thanks bois.
submitted by throwaway27727394927 to Csgohacks [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: cryptocurrencymemes top posts from 2018-12-31 to 2019-12-30 21:54 PDT

Period: 364.37 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 3412
Rate (per day) 2.74 9.34
Unique Redditors 354 1081
Combined Score 35766 8616

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 6640 points, 167 submissions: jaggedsoft
    1. relatable (207 points, 11 comments)
    2. I like guys who take big risks 😨 (137 points, 7 comments)
    3. Altseason (129 points, 8 comments)
    4. Shoulda took the money (124 points, 6 comments)
    5. Time travel ⌛ (122 points, 14 comments)
    6. i read the whitepaper 📰 (118 points, 5 comments)
    7. You never know what someone is going through (110 points, 10 comments)
    8. next alt season 🦖💥 (108 points, 7 comments)
    9. Wake up call 📞😱🔊 (106 points, 1 comment)
    10. Now that's what I'm talking about 😇 (103 points, 4 comments)
  2. 2877 points, 104 submissions: definitelynotdeleted
    1. I bought bitcoin for 20,000 and sold for $ 3000 (114 points, 5 comments)
    2. 18+ (89 points, 7 comments)
    3. Binance lottery ))) (83 points, 15 comments)
    4. BTC Dominance: 62.0% (71 points, 3 comments)
    5. BTC Dominance: 65.3% (65 points, 6 comments)
    6. Keanu won’t give you bad advice😉 (62 points, 4 comments)
    7. BTC Dominance: 69.2% (60 points, 3 comments)
    8. BTC Dominance: 70.1% (59 points, 15 comments)
    9. Bitcoin 11000$ (59 points, 2 comments)
    10. My deposit... (55 points, 4 comments)
  3. 983 points, 16 submissions: Frix13
    1. How DARE you :D (128 points, 12 comments)
    2. Nothing can scare us anymore! 💪 😎 (121 points, 8 comments)
    3. How I imagine most of us 😅 👊 (110 points, 9 comments)
    4. Do you have the same problem? 😅 💸 🚀 (107 points, 8 comments)
    5. Just HODL guys!!! 😆 (96 points, 14 comments)
    6. Every Crypto Facebook group right now :D (85 points, 2 comments)
    7. When Moon??? 🚀 (75 points, 6 comments)
    8. Im certainly not in it for the profits, that's for sure :'D (58 points, 10 comments)
    9. What is this "profits" you speak of?! 📈 (54 points, 4 comments)
    10. Don't miss the train, Bull-market here we come!!! 😂 (45 points, 3 comments)
  4. 922 points, 23 submissions: hodlorcrypt
    1. Disgusting (95 points, 65 comments)
    2. You have been visited by the nice duck (94 points, 66 comments)
    3. Point Break: Crypto Edition (83 points, 0 comments)
    4. My alts' sats whenever BTC spikes (77 points, 7 comments)
    5. Sweet, sweet airdrops (75 points, 0 comments)
    6. Shots fired (60 points, 11 comments)
    7. Trying to laugh away the pain (54 points, 2 comments)
    8. Lookin' for some lovin' (50 points, 3 comments)
    9. Marilyn Cryptoe (50 points, 4 comments)
    10. Me rollin' up to alt season (50 points, 8 comments)
  5. 746 points, 31 submissions: cryptoparody
    1. Current mood in crypto (77 points, 2 comments)
    2. Binance to block US 🇺🇸 users! (75 points, 10 comments)
    3. When Bitcoin went over $9k 💪 (54 points, 8 comments)
    4. Who wants to be a millionaire? (49 points, 7 comments)
    5. Crypto pump and dumps 🤑😵 (45 points, 3 comments)
    6. How we all feeling? (43 points, 6 comments)
    7. Throwback Thursday to 2017 💸😱 (32 points, 0 comments)
    8. The struggle is real in crypto (29 points, 6 comments)
    9. Tough road ahead for Libra 🤣 (29 points, 6 comments)
    10. They hate what they can’t control. Top 10 banks got fined a combined $174 billion for violations — dwarfing the MC of Bitcoin (27 points, 1 comment)
  6. 726 points, 21 submissions: cooriah
    1. Get out of fiat. (72 points, 2 comments)
    2. Told ya so. (72 points, 24 comments)
    3. Current financial situation (62 points, 8 comments)
    4. When someone asks for financial advice and you tell them about Bitcoin. (60 points, 4 comments)
    5. There will always be new people coming in with questions. (50 points, 16 comments)
    6. Feeling every dip after buying at the last peak. (47 points, 2 comments)
    7. Oh, it's such sweet trolling to say it back at the same smug, fiat statists. (43 points, 4 comments)
    8. If I had $267,000,000, I'd keep it on the blockchain. I would not trust any fiat bank to hold it for me. (40 points, 16 comments)
    9. Saying crypto is too slow and difficult for mass adoption is just like when they said nobody will carry a "cinder block" mobile phone around everywhere, and with that low battery capacity. (38 points, 6 comments)
    10. ♪Thats the way, a-huh a-huh, I like it, a-huh a-huh. ♫ (38 points, 3 comments)
  7. 701 points, 11 submissions: resonantseed
    1. No pain, time for gains (128 points, 8 comments)
    2. Getting help as crypto noob (106 points, 17 comments)
    3. Alts today (100 points, 11 comments)
    4. EOS birth of an ecosystem (77 points, 4 comments)
    5. Being at party with no crypto people (74 points, 9 comments)
    6. Thy holiness giveth and taketh (51 points, 2 comments)
    7. Asking shills legitimate questions (44 points, 1 comment)
    8. How it feels every time I get more crypto (41 points, 1 comment)
    9. Clutch your coins tight (34 points, 5 comments)
    10. Holding heavy alt bags (24 points, 1 comment)
  8. 654 points, 12 submissions: minecoins247365
    1. Dollar Cost Averaging into Crypto Right Now (190 points, 20 comments)
    2. How It Feels To Hold Altcoins Right Now (159 points, 18 comments)
    3. Altcoins Right Now... (70 points, 10 comments)
    4. my crypto bags right now (68 points, 6 comments)
    5. How the US Copyright Office Filed the #Faketoshi Application (52 points, 4 comments)
    6. Countdown to Altcoin Season Like... (42 points, 11 comments)
    7. Every time Craig Wright claims to be Satoshi Nakamoto (21 points, 2 comments)
    8. TFW buying $BCHABC $BCHSV $BTG (14 points, 0 comments)
    9. When Google Knows You're Drunk And Want Bitcoin (12 points, 0 comments)
    10. ...Then You Win (11 points, 1 comment)
  9. 593 points, 15 submissions: nathanielx9
    1. Found this yesterday and thought this was funny (102 points, 5 comments)
    2. Happy Valentines Day Everyone (84 points, 4 comments)
    3. Here we go again... (73 points, 5 comments)
    4. When you decide to start day trading in a bear market (70 points, 3 comments)
    5. All I want is Ramen :/ (46 points, 2 comments)
    6. Time to reuse our 2017 memes? (40 points, 2 comments)
    7. Oof (39 points, 2 comments)
    8. Shitcoin communities be like (36 points, 3 comments)
    9. Too soon? (25 points, 5 comments)
    10. Take money from banks. Deploy the fud. Take all back (21 points, 0 comments)
  10. 472 points, 17 submissions: RideYourChart
    1. Whales (68 points, 4 comments)
    2. “Fear Of Missing Out” (67 points, 6 comments)
    3. You here also because of "technology"? (65 points, 3 comments)
    4. Paid Groups (55 points, 2 comments)
    5. "it's just correction, bro" (50 points, 2 comments)
    6. Bottom again (44 points, 3 comments)
    7. This time will be x100 for sure (18 points, 0 comments)
    8. Bitcoin in last hours: (16 points, 1 comment)
    9. Initial Exchange Offering (IEO) (16 points, 0 comments)
    10. Stop Loss (13 points, 4 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. jaggedsoft (569 points, 194 comments)
  2. Thefriendlyfaceplant (161 points, 37 comments)
  3. MD5HashBrowns (118 points, 36 comments)
  4. cryptoparody (108 points, 38 comments)
  5. parakite (83 points, 37 comments)
  6. snoop_Odin (83 points, 25 comments)
  7. nathanielx9 (81 points, 29 comments)
  8. NOWPayments (74 points, 34 comments)
  9. coinminingrig (71 points, 24 comments)
  10. ChangeNow_io (70 points, 32 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. relatable by jaggedsoft (207 points, 11 comments)
  2. Dollar Cost Averaging into Crypto Right Now by minecoins247365 (190 points, 20 comments)
  3. When you buy Bitcoin at 19K by rewardstoken (181 points, 23 comments)
  4. How It Feels To Hold Altcoins Right Now by minecoins247365 (159 points, 18 comments)
  5. You gotta believe me! by gabi9900 (155 points, 8 comments)
  6. I’ve seen some shit by ZipZapBeepBoop (154 points, 10 comments)
  7. Yup. by diegojoke88 (151 points, 15 comments)
  8. I think this meme deserved a repost by NinjaDK (145 points, 7 comments)
  9. USD vs Bitcoin by coinvvolf (139 points, 9 comments)
  10. I like guys who take big risks 😨 by jaggedsoft (137 points, 7 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 31 points: T1Pimp's comment in Time travel ⌛
  2. 28 points: Iron0ne's comment in Stock trader vs crypto HODLer
  3. 24 points: yeahnoworriesmate's comment in You have been visited by the nice duck
  4. 23 points: Pr1max91's comment in Shoulda took the money
  5. 21 points: Gforcetuga's comment in Member when ____ happened in crypto? (fill in the gap)
  6. 19 points: I_Like_Tech_Drawings's comment in Dollar Cost Averaging into Crypto Right Now
  7. 18 points: Skoopitup's comment in Dollar Cost Averaging into Crypto Right Now
  8. 18 points: Thefriendlyfaceplant's comment in Yup.
  9. 18 points: kokomeows's comment in Me rollin' up to alt season
  10. 17 points: Citizen52's comment in relatable
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

Kraken soon to accept British pound deposits?

According to their tweet from yesterday they are adding a new currency.
The newly added currency pair apis suggests they are adding GBP:
https://api.kraken.com/0/public/Ticker?pair=XBTGBP
https://api.kraken.com/0/public/Ticker?pair=NMCGBP
https://api.kraken.com/0/public/Ticker?pair=LTCGBP
submitted by kikkerdril to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

28,000 Places to Buy Bitcoin for Cash in the UK - ZipZap [X-post from /r/bitcoin]

http://cashcoin.zipzapinc.com/
11 new places to buy bitcoin for me that are only a 5 minute walk away!
submitted by Mailliam to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

I almost gave up...

I've been hodling and adding to my stash since 2012. Went through the Gox debacle, Silk Road, inputs.io, slaying of the bearwhale, BitLicense, ETF, and countless ups and downs.
In the beginning, I tried trading on Gox, but always got lost in the FUD, emotion what I began to realize was manipulation. And I realized that I had no skill in playing that game. Except one skill. I had faith based on a deep understanding of what bitcoin was.
I read the whitepaper. I understood the implications and bought in. (Thank you Orlin Grabbe, RIP) So I bought more.
I bought in through dwolla/Gox, bit-instant/ZipZap, localbitcoins, etc. And I kept buying. I mixed my coins (losing a chunk to Coinlender), traded gold for coins on Agora, and kept building my hodlings while putting them in cold encrypted storage. Never sell was my motto, and I watched what was about a $20K gamble/investment grow to much much more. Enough to retire.
I watched the price constantly. Wake up at night, check the price. Wake up in the morning, check the price. And I read all of the news, the blogs, reddit (both /btc and /bitcoin, and others). I invested my Roth in GBTC. My wife's as well. I told my mainstream friends about bitcoin. All who told me I was crazy. Maybe a little I admitted.
Satoshi said it would either be worth 0 or be very valuable. I chose to believe the latter.
But recently I got discouraged. The civil war was real. Both sides bloodied, with hidden agendas following hidden money. Sock puppets manipulating opinion, threats by miners to fork and jump ship. Doom and gloom. Price crashes, big bear predictions, doom is nigh!
And I almost gave up. Almost imported my cold coins to sell. Then I saw through the fog of war. Bitcoin is anti-fragile. ANTI-FRAGILE. Weak hands sell. Traders and whales sell/buy. Manipulators buy/sell. Maybe after the next halving, I'll sell. But not now. I'll continue to hodl. Maybe even buy some more.
Just thought I'd share.
submitted by drs254 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

ZipZap adds 25k locations in UK and 240k locations in Russia for Bitcoin for Cash, beginning Jan. 2014

A spokes person of ZipZap announced last Saturday on the Bitcoin Expo in London that ZipZap is adding bitcoin to their business model. That means that from the second week of January 2014 there will be 25k small shops in UK that will hand out Bitcoin for Cash and 240k locations in Russia. Basically every small shop that is selling lottery tickets or doing money exchange will give out Bitcoins automatically because they are already connected with ZipZap.
He mentioned that briefly in the Q&A and didn't seem to realize that this is big news for the bitcoin community. I approached him later to make sure there was no misunderstanding and he confirmed it again.
I think that is a very important and big step towards mainstream acceptance and this news should spread. I dont understand why ZipZap doesn't announce that officially.
http://blog.zipzapinc.com/post/52339765880/the-future-of-bitcoin-is-mass-market-adoption https://www.zipzapinc.com http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXgTeUsNztA
submitted by pulse303 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What's up with BitInstant? (YES...I HAVE CONDUCTED PLENTY OF RESEARCH) I need some guidance...

I'm making my first order within the next two days and I'm still really confused on which route to take for Bitcoins. Believe me when I say that I have done a TON of research on the topic and still don't have a definitive answer. BitInstant seems to be the most highly recommended, but the "send to account address" function is now gone and I would have to go through MtGox. The ID verification on there is really concerning, considering that I'm putting around $700 into Bitcoins, most of which belongs to friends. I need some guidance on this issue. Note: I am not within reasonable distance of a Bank of America, so BST/Bitfloor etc are out of the question. Help!!
submitted by Ign0ranceIsBliss to SilkRoad [link] [comments]

BuyBitcoin.sg introduces bitcoin purchase at 28,000 agents throughout United Kingdom today

www.BuyBitcoin.sg
Bitcoin reseller BuyBitcoin.sg announced that it is now accepting cash payments at thousands of locations throughout United Kingdom.
“We are excited to present the easiest and fastest way to buy bitcoins in United Kingdom” said Lasse Olesen, CEO of BuyBitcoin.sg. "When signing up at BuyBitcoin.sg you can choose to buy Bitcoins with a cash deposit. We simply send a cash payment confirmation that you deliver to one of our many agents. Within minutes the cash payment is confirmed and the bitcoins will be in your wallet."
To provide this service, BuyBitcoin.sg has partnered with ZipZap Inc. to manage the cash payment infrastructure.
In other words, BuyBitcoin.sg offers UK residents a consistent way to get bitcoins using cash without dealing with international payments. “This is a key piece of infrastructure that allows Bitcoin to grow further in the UK,” said Olesen. Try it for yourself at www.BuyBitcoin.sg.
ABOUT BUYBITCOIN.SG
BuyBitcoin.sg is a website of DGT Pte Ltd, an international Bitcoin reseller based in Singapore. DGT consists of a team with years of experience in the digital currency exchange space. Founder and CEO Lasse Olesen is also known as the founder of trusted European Bitcoin reseller Bitcoin Nordic, which has been serving the European market since early 2012.
www.buybitcoin.sg
www.bitcoinnordic.com
ABOUT ZIPZAP INC.
ZipZap, Inc. is the largest global cash payment network, enabling consumers to buy bitcoin with cash at over 28,000 payment center locations throughout the UK, with more territories coming soon. Founded in 2010, ZipZap is headquartered in San Francisco, California, with operations around the globe. For more information about ZipZap, visit http://www.zipzapinc.com.
CONTACT
DGT Pte Ltd (BuyBitcoin.sg), 1 North Bridge Road #03-23, High Street Centre, Singapore, 179094, E-mail: [email protected]
ZipZap Inc., San Francisco, California, E-mail: [email protected]
Instructions:
  1. Select a payment center
  2. Upload ID and fill in details
  3. After approval of ID you'll receive payment slip by e-mail
  4. Go to payment center and pay
Confirmed by ZipZap: https://twitter.com/ZipZapInc/status/430483219704578048
submitted by fimp to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A step by step guide for newbies who want bitcoins anonymously.

This may be a long post, essentially I just thought it would curb a lot of the questions around here about how to acquire BTC. So here goes:
  1. Go to www.bitinstant.com
  2. Select cash to bitcoin address
  3. On your SR account, under "account" (on the top bar beside messages and orders) there should be a BTC address in green characters. Copy and paste that as the bitcoin address to send your BTC to on bitinstant.
  4. For your notification email they ask for on the bitinstant website form, use a tormail account for anonymity. This is free and super easy to set up. I use squirrel mail as it is the most basic. sign up here: http://jhiwjjlqpyawmpjx.onion/ and for the other info (name and DOB) make it up. but use the same fake info when you actually deposit the cash. I used my fake ID's info (I have a PA ID that I got from ID chief before he was shut down, so i use that info)
  5. After you fill that out, it will send you to zipzap. Follow the basic instructions there and use your real zipcode to find places close to you that will allow you to do this transaction. I chose CVS.
  6. follow the rest of their instructions and make sure you print out the pdf with all the information (account number and code and such). take this form with you to CVS.
  7. Go to the customer service department (or photo department lol this is where the moneygram stuff was when I went). Just pick up the red phone and listen. You will be asked an address, name, and phone number. SAY YOURE PAYING A BILL. I think they say "press 2 for bill payment". Press that. Then just follow the instructions on the phone and such. About the address and shit: Just give them any address and zipcode, same bullshit with the name. Any name will do (try and make sure it matches the fake one you originally used on bitinstant though just in case), and say you chose not to give your phone number.
  8. They will eventually tell you "you are paying a company (zip zap) please go to the counter and tell them your name and that you are paying a company"
  9. go to the cashier and tell them you are so and so paying a bill/company with moneygram and they will confirm the amount of cash.
  10. after you give them the cash, you will be on your way! :) It should take a bit for the BTC to be confirmed.
GENERAL INFO: Bitinstant will give you a specific amount. i.e. $242.97 and you MUST have exact change when you pay.
Make sure you have enough. There is a 4% fee plus zip zap takes like $3.99. So to be safe, deposit 10% more than you need. I made this mistake yesterday lol. For example: you want $250 in your SR account. Deposit $250 + 10% ($25) so you'll deposit $275.
If you go home and would like to see where your BTC currently are, take your SR address (or the address you sent to) and search it on www.blockchain.info and when that address has anywhere from 7-10 confirmations, it should appear in your SR account!
It should take about an hour or two from depositing until the time when you have BTC in your account. Happy shopping :)
If this guide sucked, I'm sorry. lol. I tried.
submitted by antoniomontana to SilkRoad [link] [comments]

I bought some bitcoin in 2013. I now have two 20-char strings and a 4-digit pin. Can I retrieve my bitcoins?

I bought some bitcoin at some point in 2013. I went to a website, printed off some kind of voucher (I think it was MoneyGram?), and I believe I went to walgreens and paid cash and they either activated it or gave me something back.
I wrote this stuff down and printed it off, and saved nothing else.
All I have is two 20-character strings (mixed upper lower and numbers) and a 4-digit pin.
Any ideas on where I might be able to enter these three pieces of info and access my old bitcoins?
edit
Update: I found the email where I originally did the MoneyPak thing! It says it's a "ZipZap Payment Slip". Maybe that would help?
submitted by BrettLefty to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating an Anonymous Wallet for Covert Practices

A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating an Anonymous Wallet for Covert Practices
With the recent Bitcoin “bubble” fiasco and the subsequent rise and fall of Bitcoin value, it seems that this subreddit has become obsessed with making money. But get-rich-quick schemes are not at the heart of Bitcoin. Instead BTC should be seen as a way to keep Big Governments and Big Businesses from knowing how much money you have and what you choose to spend that money on. As a currency, it doesn't matter how much the value fluctuates if you plan on spending your wealth on sites like the Silk Road and etc.
(OK, maybe it does matter a little bit if the money you spent yesterday is worth twice as much today; but this guide is for spenders, not hoarders. Or at least for hoarders who also like to spend.)
Let's discuss my favorite attribute of the Bitcoin protocol: anonymity.
Many noobs getting into the Bitcoin game fail to realize that anonymity is an important key to understanding the importance of Bitcoin. In places where your wealth can easily be taking away from you (see Cyprus, Russia, China, the USA and others), Bitcoin can function like a store of cash buried in a dessert in the middle of nowhere – buried so deep that nobody can find it, not even the most powerful men and women on Earth.
POINT: If you are purchasing your Bitcoins through services like Coinbase or Mt. Gox, and if you've ever given your real name and bank account information to a Bitcoin Exchange, then you are NOT anonymous. Your Bitcoins can be traced back to you. Your purchases are recorded in the blockchain, and although it's difficult, it's certainly not impossible for those with the knowhow to find you and prosecute you. See this link before continuing.
Bitcoin is not inherently anonymous. You must take steps to protect yourself in order to keep your identity a secret. And even still, if you don't know what you are doing, you run the risk of being caught. So if you care about hiding yourself and your money, I offer this guide as a way to accomplish secret purchases and covert trades. Of course I cannot guarantee you won't end up in jail. At the end of the day, nobody knows how closely governments are tracking BTC purchases over the TOR network. Some people even believe that the TOR network was created by nefarious forces. I doubt it, but you never really know.
STEP ONE: Anonymous Hardware
Because you cannot really know whether or not you are being watched, your first step in creating an anonymous wallet is to protect yourself by buying a cheap laptop computer and removing the hard-drive. Really, who needs a hard-drive anyway? Toss it in the garbage.
STEP TWO: Anonymous Software
If you don't know how to download a Linux LiveCD, then stop reading now. You are probably not skilled enough to protect yourself anyway. If you don't know how to download a Linux LiveCD, then proceed with extreme caution; downloading an ISO file and burning it to a DVD is pretty damned easy. Easier than anonymity. Those who refuse to learn are at risk.
It's arguable which software you should use, but I recommend connecting to the TOR network using TAILS, a live DVD or live USB that aims at preserving your privacy and anonymity. TAILS helps you to use the Internet anonymously, leave no trace on the computer you're using, and to use state-of-the-art cryptographic tools to encrypt your files, email and instant messaging.
ProTip: For an extra layer of protection, download the ISO from your local library's computer. Or while you're sipping a mocha at Starbuck's. Then burn it to a DVD and take it home. Place it in your crap computer (the one without a hard-drive) and turn it on. Enter the BIOS menu and boot from CD if your computer doesn't do it automatically.
DO NOT CONNECT TO THE NETWORK FROM YOUR HOME.
I repeat, for an extra layer of security, DO NOT CONNECT TO YOUR HOME WIFI USING TAILS IF YOU WANT TO DO SHADY THINGS. That's just common sense. TAILS itself isn't illegal. But if you're the type to do shady things, you don't want to practice on your home Wifi, which you probably pay for with a bank account or credit card.
After you've spent a day or two using TAILS and familiarizing yourself with the LinuxOS, and once you feel comfortable enough to continue, then head back to your local Starbucks, boot up the LiveCD, and connect. Browse the TOR network and triple-check that you are protected. You can do this by checking your IP address for DNS LEAKS. Only if you feel comfortably hidden from prying eyes will you want to continue.
STEP THREE: Creating an Anonymous Wallet
There are several different ways to to this, but the easiest way is to use the code at bitadress.org. Thanks to SpenserHanson for creating this thread which describes the process in detail:
  1. Save bitaddress.org.html to your computer
  2. Close browser.
  3. Disable computer Wi-Fi.
  4. Open bitaddress.org.html in browser.
  5. Generate an address and record the private keys.
  6. Close the browser window.
  7. Go home. Think about what you are about to do.
STEP FOUR: Funding the Anonymous Wallet
Funding your wallet will be the most difficult part of this process. Obviously you don't want to go to a site like Coinbase or Mt. Gox and link up you bank account, then start sending coins to your anonymous address. That would be stupid. Very stupid.
Probably the best way to get coins is to know someone who is willing to send you a few, but even then you lead a trail back to your friend.
My suggestion is to make cash deposits through ZipZap or Bitinstant, and give them false information (for example, use the new email you created, over the TOR network, from a site like Hotmail or Yahoo, which doesn't require a phone number to sign up – I'm looking at you Gmail. Make sure your new account forwards your email to yet another account, perhaps Tormail or a temp address. You probably won't need to use the email more than once anyway, for confirmation, if you need it. And you might want to create a new address with every deposit, just to be safe). There are other options of course. Some companies will sell you Bitcoins anonymously through Bank of America cash deposits. But remember that the moment you walk into a Big Bank and give them money, you are caught on camera. Maybe offer a homeless man some money to make the deposit for you. And hope he doesn't just pocket your money. Regardless, you want to stay away from Big Banks if you can. It really isn't that hard.
If you absolutely must make deposits from your bank account, you could send your coins to an anonymous online wallet first and then to cold storage, but make sure to use several mixing services over a period of several days. And then have trouble sleeping at night.
Another great idea is to use the localbitcoins website; meet with a seller locally; pay cash and GTFO.
STEP FOUR: Spending from the Anonymous Wallet
If you are looking to CASH OUT, there aren't many anonymous options besides meeting with somebody and selling face to face. You could always sign up for your own account at localbitcoins, then hope a buyer contacts you. But this guide isn't about making money, it's about spending your coins.
To buy things, you'll want to go to back to the library, connect through TAILS, download a lite client like Electrum and access your account. Every time you want to spend, you will have to re-download, but it should not take more than a few minutes. And though you are probably safe enough to spend directly from the client, if you really want to be safe you should send the funds to a second wallet though a mixing service, then to a third or fourth or fifth wallet, also through mixing services. These “Mixing Wallets” should NOT be created using the TOR network because the TOR exit node may be monitored. I've never had a problem myself, but it's theoretically possible that an attacker could record the password/private keys for the hosted wallet and steal your coins. Which is why you should NEVER USE THE SAME ACCOUNT TWICE. And never access your cold storage wallet through the net. That would be very very bad.
To created the mixing wallets you will also need a way to hide your identify without using TOR. The best way to do this is to sign up for a VPN service though a public WiFi hotspot and then pay in Bitcoin. The best service I have found is called Private Internet Access. You can access their service through a public computer, connect to the VPN, and voila, you now can safely create mixing wallets without exposing your password to the open network. Make sure that after you mix the coins you send them all to a safe, final address, which will be your Spending Wallet.
Remaining anonymous will cost your some time and money. With each transaction you're going to have to pay for mixing, and also the transaction fee. And setting up a new email and a new account with every transaction (so that you can spread the coins across multiple fake accounts) will be bothersome but worth it in the long run. You can't put a price on piece of mind when it comes to your safety.
REMEMBER Your Spending Wallet should not contain all of your funds. The bulk of your coins should be address you created using bitaddress. Never trust an online service to hold the bulk of your funds. The recent hacks have shown that the best place to store your private key is in your head.
Final Notes:
The Bitcoin protocol itself is not anonymous. And theoretically it's possible to trace every transaction back to you. This is why you need to use fake emails, many multiple addresses, and a VPN service with heavy encryption. Even with the knowledge and the technology to map the blockchain, the FEDS will have a hell of a time tracking multiple address though VPN tunneling back to a cold storage wallet that you created offline and only use to send coins over TOR. There are just too many roadblocks. Of course nothing is impossible. But I sleep very good at night knowing that my door is not going to be kicked in by the Men in Black. And even if you're not doing anything illegal, this sort of behavior is certainly suspicious.
If you were lucky enough to receive a tip from Reddit's own bitcoinbillionaire (I myself was not) and you haven't cashed out. Create a VPN-tunneled throwaway account and tip yourself before claiming your coins. Then send them through a mixing service and to your cold storage address. Now you're on your way to being an anonymous spender.
I hope this guide helps. I really do. The purpose of Bitcoin isn't to make money. It's to protect the money that you already have, and to protect your identity in places where your identity is compromised. Everybody in the world wants your money, especially the richest of the rich. You ought to do everything you can to keep yourself safe. Especially if you live in a compromised geography.
TL;DR: Go directly to jail. Do not pass Go. Do not collect $200.
EDIT: Some typos.
submitted by anon_spender to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Litecoin being added by ZipZap! Litecoin will be available over the counter to buy for cash in 25k UK locations and 240k Russian locations!

See the linked reddit comment: http://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/1rzjjl/zipzap_adds_25k_locations_in_uk_and_240k/cdshqvu
This is a huge win for Litecoin as it's even harder to buy Litecoin with cash than Bitcoin.
To explain the comments:
submitted by hammertimeisnow to litecoin [link] [comments]

DO NOT USE BITINSTANT

I sent Bitinstant 240$ on March 5th. I still don't have my bitcoins. Bitinstant didn't even send me an email to confirm that they received my order. Zip Zap confirmed that my money was transfered to them (my account # is 606793743). I have used "live chat" and emailed Bitinstant for the past month and i have yet to be given any information about my order. No order ID, no ETA, only several false assurance that my request had been forwarded to tech support and would be processed within the next business day.
EDIT: My order was processed 4/19/13...
submitted by rforcum to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bought some Bitcoin in a convenience store round the corner using cash

I got curious about the cheaper 'cash payment' option on Bittylicious, found out they go through ZipZap who are connected to PayZone, which has over 25k small shops in the UK signed up to it - the map on Bitty showed me there was a shop literally over the road from my nearest cash point, so signed up for 0.7 BTC for £135, printed out the barcode, went and got the cash out and handed them both over to the store owners, who had never come close to hearing about bitcoin, from what I could tell.
The 0.7 BTC was in my wallet by the time I got home.
Side question - is this the cheapest way to buy in UK?
Edit: related news post
submitted by theapplejuice to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

My horrible BitInstant/ZipZap/MoneyGram/7-Eleven experience

Here's my experience using BitInstant to get a VouchX code at 1:00am.
TL;DR: Undisclosed fees; lots of personal details; what should have taken 5 minutes took 45; apathetic 7-Eleven clerk couldn't take ownership of issues with his company's own shitty kiosk; BitInstant sends me the money in a form not quite as insecure as banknotes taped to a postcard.
It was a late Thursday night, dipping into early Friday. BitMe had a low bid price for BTC. With BitMe, I'd usually deposit at a Chase branch, but I expected the price to rise too much by the time I could make it to a branch and the BitMe guy could confirm my deposit. I anticipated a lot of people putting their Friday paychecks into Bitcoin, so I was in a rush to buy. For this reason, I decided to pay the premium of BitInstant.
The first disappointment with BitInstant was that in order to deposit at a MoneyGram terminal, I'd have to pay an additional $3.95 to another middleman called "ZipZap." The BitInstant site doesn't mention this extra fee on the main page, where the 3.99% commission amount is quoted. The earliest point in time that I could learn the amount of the $3.95 extra fee was after I filled in order information (including my name and date of birth) on BitInstant, was taken to ZipZap, filled in my phone number, selected a MoneyGram location, and then finally downloaded the payment slip.
ZipZap sent me an e-mail, but their mail servers weren't configured correctly, so I never got it. My e-mail server logs show:
Mar 8 03:20:16 ophelia postfix/smtpd[17694]: connect from smtp.zipzapinc.com[184.169.154.190] Mar 8 03:20:16 ophelia postfix/smtpd[17694]: NOQUEUE: reject: RCPT from ... smtp.zipzapinc.com[184.169.154.190]: 504 5.5.2 : ... Helo command rejected: need fully-qualified hostname; from= ... to= proto=ESMTP helo= Mar 8 03:20:16 ophelia postfix/smtpd[17694]: disconnect from smtp.zipzapinc.com[184.169.154.190] 
ZipZap's web page says something to the effect of "anonymous payment." Later, at the MoneyGram location, I had to provide my name, phone number, and mailing address. (The address was never needed by BitInstant or ZipZap.)
I chose 7-Eleven store #18256 at 924 E. Empire Ave., Spokane, WA 99207 as the MoneyGram location, because 7-Eleven was the only local chain of MoneyGram locations open at that hour. Their MoneyGram solution was a Vcom kiosk. These multifunction kiosks, in addition to providing ATM and check services also act as MoneyGram terminals.
The first irk in the process was that the machine asked me to call a certain phone number for MoneyGram customer service, and no courtesy phone was provided on the machine. The store clerk didn't have a phone for me to use either. I wasted $1.26 on a 7 minute phone call from my by-the-minute phone (with plans optimized for texting, not voice). In 7 minutes, my name, address, phone number, "receive code" (a unique code for ZipZap), and payment amount was taken; it could have taken me no longer than 2 minutes for me to carefully enter and double-check this information on the terminal itself. I understand there is a market for customer service that delivers warm fuzzies, but this wasted my time and money and subjected me to a guy not from my continent who was difficult to hear over the connection.
Now it was time to deposit the money. The machine instructed me to insert one bill at a time, so I did. I was paying $385 in 20 banknotes. The machine would accept one banknote, give a message "not enough cash inserted," wait about 15 seconds, then show me the balance of how much money remains to be inserted. Well, of course not enough money was inserted, I don't have a $385 banknote and you told me to insert one at a time! I counted later to find that the machine processes banknotes at a rate of once every 20 seconds, so I spent over six minutes hand-feeding money into this machine, in front of a bored clerk at a slow 7-Eleven. I felt really bad for that guy, since he had store work to do and pretty much had to babysit me to make sure I wasn't going to walk off with anything.
Finally, the last note! Okay, it's doing .. something, and ... "this transaction could not be completed at this time." [Paraphrased, but no specific reason was given.] The machine then took a couple minutes to return my money, this time in the form of 16 banknotes. At least all my money was accounted for, but what gives?
The clerk tried to convince me that the machine doesn't work, and suggested I try calling whoever I'm trying to pay at 8:00am, start of business. I explained to him that this payment is time sensitive, that's why I'm doing this in the middle of the night.
Finally, it dawned on me that I never gave my "account number," a unique identifying code for the ZipZap transaction, to the MoneyGram phone agent. But he did ask for my phone number twice! I must have misheard him. Drat. I let the clerk know what my mistake was, but he tried his hardest to convince me that the machine didn't work as intended and suggested I try another 7-Eleven that was about an hour and a half on foot for me. I declined and told him I'd use the payphone to reach MoneyGram this time.
Back from another 5-10 call, I come into the store to find a note taped over the machine's screen, "out of order." The clerk is at this point telling me with matter-of-fact authority in his voice that the machine won't do what I want, and that it's out of service for everything but ATM and MoneyGram transactions. (Even after I tried several times to explain, he wouldn't accept that I was in fact trying to do a MoneyGram transaction.) Even though I explained to him that this is a time-sensitive payment--that is why I'm up at 2:00 in the morning taking care of this business--and it will be a 45 minute walk home for nothing, he insists that I am not allowed to use the machine. He even explicitly told me that he has work to do and it's taken him too long keeping an eye on me. I plead with him and sympathize about how horribly slow these machines are, how it's not his fault, and finally get through to him to let me try one more time, the final persuasive argument being that the machine gave me my money in $100 notes this time, so it won't take so long. (I didn't let him know that only two notes were $100s, while the rest were in $20s and $1s, but it was still fewer notes.) He doesn't even have the courtesy to say "yes," "okay," "sure," or "just one more time;" he just peels off his because-I-can "out of order" sign off the machine and goes about his business without saying a word.
Seriously? What's the point of this fancy self-serve kiosk if I need to call some guy in the Indian subcontinent to set up the transaction? How many millions of dollars were poured into the design, implementation, and rollout of these good-for-nothing machines that take ages to accept your cash? And then to have some apathetic, underpaid store clerk tell me he's got better things to do than take responsibility for how slowly his company's proprietary, fancy e-commerce kiosks work? Remember, he intentionally mislead me earlier by telling me another 7-Eleven store has a similar machine that might work, and (as it turns out) flat-out lied in telling me the machine is simply out of order. Oh, and I'm paying $3.95 to ZipZap for this, most of which probably goes to the MoneyGram commission.
Wondering how many middle-men there were between my money and my Bitcoin, by the way? BitMe, AurumXchange (for VouchX), BitInstant, ZipZap, MoneyGram, CardTronics (current owners of the brilliant Vcom franchise of time-saving kiosks), and 7-Eleven. Holy wow, maybe $3.95 + 3.99% was a steal.
All said, I spent about 45 minutes in that store. For what should have been 5 minutes worth of business. Beyond the pale.
On the second attempt, my money went through, I got a receipt, and when I got home I got a neat code I could paste into BitMe to get some instant USD in there. But let's not forget the final blunder: BitInstant delivered a code worth $365 good-as-cash to me by regular, unencrypted e-mail. Stupid.
Now I'm fighting bidding bots on BitMe.
submitted by piranha to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Can we as a community put together a list comparing the different ways to get BitCoins, the times involved, etc?

I'm not sure what format would be the best. Maybe we could get it added to the Reddit SilkRoad Wiki. Since these services come and go, it is quite interesting at times how to get BitCoins.
Things to include: -Country -Method of original payment -Time for payment to clear -Time for BitCoin transaction to cleat -What percentage of money is taken by BitCoin transaction -Total Time of Transaction
Here is what I have used in the past:
BlockChain cash deposit through BitInstant in the USA - Blockchain accesses ZipZap payment service, ZipZap then instructs user to use MoneyGram express. Moneygram express is used anonymously at a WalMart, which excepts debit for purchase. ZipZap payment goes through BitInstant, finally BitInstant transfers to BlockChain account. Total time 30mins to several hours. Requires driving to Moneygram site. Fees - ZipZap $3.95. BitInstant 3.99%
CoinBase by bank transfer: Create a CoinBase account (USA only). Confirm back account wiring. Since buying BitCoins is legal, I see no problem with this. Coins can be ordered through CoinBase at a 1% fee. Once the account is set up the transactions take 3-5 business days to be confirmed. Small fee, longer wait time than BitInstant.
I would like to know more methods of transfer and how they work. I also signed up for a Dwolla account, but would have to go through BitInstant (I believe). I feel like this would be massively beneficial to the community! I am also looking for a method that could be done within a day, preferably use bank transfer, and have a percentage loss at about 2% or less. Lets hear the methods and get a permanent working source going!
submitted by takingajourney to SilkRoad [link] [comments]

My LTC wishes for 2014 : MtGox, ZipZap, Coinbase, Coinkite, Bitcoiniacs, Coinkite, Lamassu ATMs and so much more...

What I expect for the new year :
Well, I think it will be enough for the first part of the new year... And you, what do you expect for the new year ? (I may have been a little shy about my predictions...)
Happy end-of-year celebration from Paris, France.
submitted by notsogreedy to litecoin [link] [comments]

04-28 17:23 - 'World Crypto Lotto Launching Right Now' (worldcryptolotto.online) by /u/ImZipZap removed from /r/Bitcoin within 178-188min

World Crypto Lotto Launching Right Now
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: ImZipZap
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

BitInstant Service Sucks Enough for ME to make it MY 1st Post!

I get it. They got hacked cause the owner of the site didn't expect that BitCoins would get hit like it did with the sudden influx of publicity and couldn't keep up with demand. The guy/gal even didn't do a 2 part verification process and became the victim of a simple social engineering hack that strolled away with about $12,000(?) of the companies bankroll before they noticed and pulled the servers. I sympathize with them and hope everyone in the BitCoin community learned a valuable lesson in password safety.
I read on the BitInstant blog that they got the servers up and running and was even paying the value of BitCoins at the time of purchase. Gotta be honest and say I was relieved to hear the news. That was a move that I wasn't expecting, but was a true sign that they wanted to show respect and trust by taking an even larger amount out of there bankroll.
But why am I so pissed that I have to make my 1st Reddit post one trashing BitInstant right in the headline?
Customer service is not what they are good at. Nor are they good at following thru with what they say. I'm laid back and a go with the flow kinda guy. During week 2 I even asked if they still were hiring. I want them to be the good guys. I root for the underdogs and never want to kick a guy when he's down. However, my transaction was done right about the time that I deposited my $150 at my local ZipZap location after 3 weeks of watching and learning the good and the bad from people about ways to get coins. This was my 1st transaction into the BitCoin world. I've been told to rest assured toward the end of week one. Week two I sent 3 emails and made 1 phone call. Read the blog about how they were taking care of damage control with what I considered respectful and sympathetic to us BitInstant victims.
Yet, now it's week three. My emails have become more frequent, 3 this past weekend and all of them posted where I noticed they aimed there damage control mods. I'm not sure what to do now. I want to post nasty things, call them names and be all psychoticly emotional and yet, I'm also understanding of the mess they are in. I'm however NOT ok with ZERO response. I'm NOT ok with wasting MY time writing emails and watching my inbox for 3 weeks or hoping that that noise I just heard is going to really be them saying "hey, you got your funds. Told you not to worry! We're deeply sorry!!!".
I don't ever see that email obviously. I don't even get a reason why or letting me know they're still working on it and that they still haven't forgotten about me. I feel like i'm just an unnoticed blip they see scrolling thru the other countless emails that the others keep posting with the same issues.
Hi, Reddit :-) I just pop my posting cherry. I was hoping it would've been about something original and cheery :-(
submitted by 1strangelove to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

PSA: More examples of Bitinstant's suspicious exchage rates

I know there was a similar post by u/psapsaps 3 days ago about this issue. I decided to take a chance and try it out anyway becase its the easiest and quickest way for me to obtain btc right now.
My first purchase was of $100 usd, + the $3.95 for zip zap they dont even warn you about.
purchase was executed around 2:30pm utc on 4/16. I got a confirmation email at 2:33 utc
mt.gox was at $65 +-$3
considering bitinstant fee of 3.99%, my deposit was of $96.01
i received 1.20595 at 3:52 pm utc at the rate of $79.61 , so theres that. Where were my bitcoins from 2:30 pm utc to 3:52 utc?
Well i decided it was worth another try just for the sake of getting more information.
today 4/18 at 1:05 pm utc i got a confirmation form zip zap that my second purchase (this time of $200) had been succesfully processed. Bitinstant emailed 3 minutes before that at 1:02 pm to confirm that my order had executed for 192.02.
at 1:07pm utc i receive 2.01639364 btc at the rate of $95.22
mt.gox had been at $92 +-$1 during the surpricingly short amout of time it took for my cash deposited at 1:00 pm utc to turn into bitcoins in my wallet at 1:07 pm utc.. but whats up with the exchage rate?
I just wanted to share my experiance with reddit about bitinstant so that everyone can make a more informed opinion about their service. If anyone has any information to prove that im an idiot, please share. i hope this is all an error on my own or on bitinstant part.
edit: At this url... well this:
"As regards bitcoin price: We will honour the price from the time your order was placed - but we will usually do so by sending you the difference manually with a fee refund after dealing with delayed orders.
Since price has recently dropped, it may in fact be in a lot of customer's interests to allow their orders to execute at current prices and this is what we would recommend."
-April 11, 2013 | Gareth Nelson
edit: added pm markers for utc time, I am in US central time
submitted by bitdetective to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

0x00.txt - the write-up/guide from the FinFisher hack

Here is the write-up/guide from the FinFisher hack, which is excellent reading - it is also mirrored here. Hopefully we will get the Hacking Team one soon.
 _ _ _ ____ _ _ | | | | __ _ ___| | __ | __ ) __ _ ___| | _| | | |_| |/ _` |/ __| |/ / | _ \ / _` |/ __| |/ / | | _ | (_| | (__| < | |_) | (_| | (__| <|_| |_| |_|\__,_|\___|_|\_\ |____/ \__,_|\___|_|\_(_) A DIY Guide for those without the patience to wait for whistleblowers 
--1-- Introduction
I'm not writing this to brag about what an 31337 h4x0r I am and what m4d sk1llz it took to 0wn Gamma. I'm writing this to demystify hacking, to show how simple it is, and to hopefully inform and inspire you to go out and hack shit. If you have no experience with programming or hacking, some of the text below might look like a foreign language. Check the resources section at the end to help you get started. And trust me, once you've learned the basics you'll realize this really is easier than filing a FOIA request.
-- 2 -- Staying Safe
This is illegal, so you'll need to take same basic precautions:
  1. Make a hidden encrypted volume with Truecrypt 7.1a
  2. Inside the encrypted volume install Whonix
  3. (Optional) While just having everything go over Tor thanks to Whonix is probably sufficient, it's better to not use an internet connection connected to your name or address. A cantenna, aircrack, and reaver can come in handy here.
As long as you follow common sense like never do anything hacking related outside of Whonix, never do any of your normal computer usage inside Whonix, never mention any information about your real life when talking with other hackers, and never brag about your illegal hacking exploits to friends in real life, then you can pretty much do whatever you want with no fear of being v&.
NOTE: I do NOT recommend actually hacking directly over Tor. While Tor is usable for some things like web browsing, when it comes to using hacking tools like nmap, sqlmap, and nikto that are making thousands of requests, they will run very slowly over Tor. Not to mention that you'll want a public IP address to receive connect back shells. I recommend using servers you've hacked or a VPS paid with bitcoin to hack from. That way only the low bandwidth text interface between you and the server is over Tor. All the commands you're running will have a nice fast connection to your target.
-- 3 -- Mapping out the target
Basically I just repeatedly use fierce.pl, whois lookups on IP addresses and domain names, and reverse whois lookups to find all IP address space and domain names associated with an organization.
For an example let's take Blackwater. We start out knowing their homepage is at academi.com. Running fierce.pl -dns academi.com we find the subdomains:
67.238.84.228 email.academi.com 67.238.84.242 extranet.academi.com 67.238.84.240 mail.academi.com 67.238.84.230 secure.academi.com 67.238.84.227 vault.academi.com 54.243.51.249 www.academi.com 
Now we do whois lookups and find the homepage of www.academi.com is hosted on Amazon Web Service, while the other IPs are in the range:
NetRange: 67.238.84.224 - 67.238.84.255 CIDR: 67.238.84.224/27 CustName: Blackwater USA Address: 850 Puddin Ridge Rd 
Doing a whois lookup on academi.com reveals it's also registered to the same address, so we'll use that as a string to search with for the reverse whois lookups. As far as I know all the actual reverse whois lookup services cost money, so I just cheat with google:
"850 Puddin Ridge Rd" inurl:ip-address-lookup "850 Puddin Ridge Rd" inurl:domaintools 
Now run fierce.pl -range on the IP ranges you find to lookup dns names, and fierce.pl -dns on the domain names to find subdomains and IP addresses. Do more whois lookups and repeat the process until you've found everything.
Also just google the organization and browse around its websites. For example on academi.com we find links to a careers portal, an online store, and an employee resources page, so now we have some more:
54.236.143.203 careers.academi.com 67.132.195.12 academiproshop.com 67.238.84.236 te.academi.com 67.238.84.238 property.academi.com 67.238.84.241 teams.academi.com 
If you repeat the whois lookups and such you'll find academiproshop.com seems to not be hosted or maintained by Blackwater, so scratch that off the list of interesting IPs/domains.
In the case of FinFisher what led me to the vulnerable finsupport.finfisher.com was simply a whois lookup of finfisher.com which found it registered to the name "FinFisher GmbH". Googling for:
"FinFisher GmbH" inurl:domaintools 
finds gamma-international.de, which redirects to finsupport.finfisher.com
...so now you've got some idea how I map out a target.
This is actually one of the most important parts, as the larger the attack surface that you are able to map out, the easier it will be to find a hole somewhere in it.
-- 4 -- Scanning & Exploiting
Scan all the IP ranges you found with nmap to find all services running. Aside from a standard port scan, scanning for SNMP is underrated.
Now for each service you find running:
  1. Is it exposing something it shouldn't? Sometimes companies will have services running that require no authentication and just assume it's safe because the url or IP to access it isn't public. Maybe fierce found a git subdomain and you can go to git.companyname.come/gitweb/ and browse their source code.
  2. Is it horribly misconfigured? Maybe they have an ftp server that allows anonymous read or write access to an important directory. Maybe they have a database server with a blank admin password (lol stratfor). Maybe their embedded devices (VOIP boxes, IP Cameras, routers etc) are using the manufacturer's default password.
  3. Is it running an old version of software vulnerable to a public exploit?
Webservers deserve their own category. For any webservers, including ones nmap will often find running on nonstandard ports, I usually:
  1. Browse them. Especially on subdomains that fierce finds which aren't intended for public viewing like test.company.com or dev.company.com you'll often find interesting stuff just by looking at them.
  2. Run nikto. This will check for things like webserve.svn/, webservebackup/, webservephpinfo.php, and a few thousand other common mistakes and misconfigurations.
  3. Identify what software is being used on the website. WhatWeb is useful
  4. Depending on what software the website is running, use more specific tools like wpscan, CMS-Explorer, and Joomscan.
First try that against all services to see if any have a misconfiguration, publicly known vulnerability, or other easy way in. If not, it's time to move on to finding a new vulnerability:
5) Custom coded web apps are more fertile ground for bugs than large widely used projects, so try those first. I use ZAP, and some combination of its automated tests along with manually poking around with the help of its intercepting proxy.
6) For the non-custom software they're running, get a copy to look at. If it's free software you can just download it. If it's proprietary you can usually pirate it. If it's proprietary and obscure enough that you can't pirate it you can buy it (lame) or find other sites running the same software using google, find one that's easier to hack, and get a copy from them.
For finsupport.finfisher.com the process was:
At this point I can see the news stories that journalists will write to drum up views: "In a sophisticated, multi-step attack, hackers first compromised a web design firm in order to acquire confidential data that would aid them in attacking Gamma Group..."
But it's really quite easy, done almost on autopilot once you get the hang of it. It took all of a couple minutes to:
Looking through the source code they might as well have named it Damn Vulnerable Web App v2. It's got sqli, LFI, file upload checks done client side in javascript, and if you're unauthenticated the admin page just sends you back to the login page with a Location header, but you can have your intercepting proxy filter the Location header out and access it just fine.
Heading back over to the finsupport site, the admin /BackOffice/ page returns 403 Forbidden, and I'm having some issues with the LFI, so I switch to using the sqli (it's nice to have a dozen options to choose from). The other sites by the web designer all had an injectable print.php, so some quick requests to:
https://finsupport.finfisher.com/GGI/Home/print.php?id=1 and 1=1 https://finsupport.finfisher.com/GGI/Home/print.php?id=1 and 2=1 
reveal that finsupport also has print.php and it is injectable. And it's database admin! For MySQL this means you can read and write files. It turns out the site has magicquotes enabled, so I can't use INTO OUTFILE to write files. But I can use a short script that uses sqlmap --file-read to get the php source for a URL, and a normal web request to get the HTML, and then finds files included or required in the php source, and finds php files linked in the HTML, to recursively download the source to the whole site.
Looking through the source, I see customers can attach a file to their support tickets, and there's no check on the file extension. So I pick a username and password out of the customer database, create a support request with a php shell attached, and I'm in!
-- 5 -- (fail at) Escalating
< got r00t? >
 \ ^__^ \ (oo)\_______ (__)\ )\/\ ||----w | || || ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
Root over 50% of linux servers you encounter in the wild with two easy scripts, Linux_Exploit_Suggester, and unix-privesc-check.
finsupport was running the latest version of Debian with no local root exploits, but unix-privesc-check returned:
WARNING: /etc/cron.hourly/mgmtlicensestatus is run by cron as root. The user www-data can write to /etc/cron.hourly/mgmtlicensestatus WARNING: /etc/cron.hourly/webalizer is run by cron as root. The user www-data 
can write to /etc/cron.hourly/webalizer
so I add to /etc/cron.hourly/webalizer:
chown root:root /path/to/my_setuid_shell chmod 04755 /path/to/my_setuid_shell 
wait an hour, and ....nothing. Turns out that while the cron process is running it doesn't seem to be actually running cron jobs. Looking in the webalizer directory shows it didn't update stats the previous month. Apparently after updating the timezone cron will sometimes run at the wrong time or sometimes not run at all and you need to restart cron after changing the timezone.
ls -l /etc/localtime shows the timezone got updated June 6, the same time webalizer stopped recording stats, so that's probably the issue. At any rate, the only thing this server does is host the website, so I already have access to everything interesting on it. Root wouldn't get much of anything new, so I move on to the rest of the network.
-- 6 -- Pivoting
The next step is to look around the local network of the box you hacked. This is pretty much the same as the first Scanning & Exploiting step, except that from behind the firewall many more interesting services will be exposed. A tarball containing a statically linked copy of nmap and all its scripts that you can upload and run on any box is very useful for this. The various nfs-* and especially smb-* scripts nmap has will be extremely useful.
The only interesting thing I could get on finsupport's local network was another webserver serving up a folder called 'qateam' containing their mobile malware.
-- 7 -- Have Fun
Once you're in their networks, the real fun starts. Just use your imagination. While I titled this a guide for wannabe whistleblowers, there's no reason to limit yourself to leaking documents. My original plan was to:
  1. Hack Gamma and obtain a copy of the FinSpy server software
  2. Find vulnerabilities in FinSpy server.
  3. Scan the internet for, and hack, all FinSpy C&C servers.
  4. Identify the groups running them.
  5. Use the C&C server to upload and run a program on all targets telling them who was spying on them.
  6. Use the C&C server to uninstall FinFisher on all targets.
  7. Join the former C&C servers into a botnet to DDoS Gamma Group.
It was only after failing to fully hack Gamma and ending up with some interesting documents but no copy of the FinSpy server software that I had to make due with the far less lulzy backup plan of leaking their stuff while mocking them on twitter.
Point your GPUs at FinSpy-PC+Mobile-2012-07-12-Final.zip and crack the password already so I can move on to step 2!
-- 8 -- Other Methods
The general method I outlined above of scan, find vulnerabilities, and exploit is just one way to hack, probably better suited to those with a background in programming. There's no one right way, and any method that works is as good as any other. The other main ways that I'll state without going into detail are:
1) Exploits in web browers, java, flash, or microsoft office, combined with emailing employees with a convincing message to get them to open the link or attachment, or hacking a web site frequented by the employees and adding the browsejava/flash exploit to that.
This is the method used by most of the government hacking groups, but you don't need to be a government with millions to spend on 0day research or subscriptions to FinSploit or VUPEN to pull it off. You can get a quality russian exploit kit for a couple thousand, and rent access to one for much less. There's also metasploit browser autopwn, but you'll probably have better luck with no exploits and a fake flash updater prompt.
2) Taking advantage of the fact that people are nice, trusting, and helpful 95% of the time.
The infosec industry invented a term to make this sound like some sort of science: "Social Engineering". This is probably the way to go if you don't know too much about computers, and it really is all it takes to be a successful hacker.
-- 9 -- Resources
Links:
Books:
  • The Web Application Hacker's Handbook
  • Hacking: The Art of Exploitation
  • The Database Hacker's Handbook
  • The Art of Software Security Assessment
  • A Bug Hunter's Diary
  • Underground: Tales of Hacking, Madness, and Obsession on the Electronic Frontier
  • TCP/IP Illustrated
Aside from the hacking specific stuff almost anything useful to a system administrator for setting up and administering networks will also be useful for exploring them. This includes familiarity with the windows command prompt and unix shell, basic scripting skills, knowledge of ldap, kerberos, active directory, networking, etc.
-- 10 -- Outro
You'll notice some of this sounds exactly like what Gamma is doing. Hacking is a tool. It's not selling hacking tools that makes Gamma evil. It's who their customers are targeting and with what purpose that makes them evil. That's not to say that tools are inherently neutral. Hacking is an offensive tool. In the same way that guerrilla warfare makes it harder to occupy a country, whenever it's cheaper to attack than to defend it's harder to maintain illegitimate authority and inequality. So I wrote this to try to make hacking easier and more accessible. And I wanted to show that the Gamma Group hack really was nothing fancy, just standard sqli, and that you do have the ability to go out and take similar action.
Solidarity to everyone in Gaza, Israeli conscientious-objectors, Chelsea Manning, Jeremy Hammond, Peter Sunde, anakata, and all other imprisoned hackers, dissidents, and criminals!
submitted by m1croc0d3 to HowToHack [link] [comments]

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