3 Best Bitcoin Clients for Ubuntu - Tech Drive-in

(Updated) [Staking] Reddcoin Core client GUI wallet on a Raspberry Pi Model 3B

Intro

This thread is an update to my first Reddcoin staking tutorial that was written 7 months ago.
 
The reason for the update
My Reddcoin Core software crashed and became unusable. My Raspberry Pi 3B would lag and freeze, I couldn't stake anymore.
 
Instead of just redoing everything the same way, I wanted to see if I could improve on 3 points:
 
The updates
 
If you would like to tip me
Writing a tutorial like this takes time and effort; tips are appreciated. My Reddcoin address: RqvdnNX5MTam855Y2Vudv7yVgtXdcYaQAW.
     

Overview

 

Steps

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Snr5e8bzftI
This video shows how long it takes to start Reddcoin Core.   TL;DR:
     

Extra

Backup
Backup your wallet to prevent losing the RDDs in your wallet! There are two methods to backup, do both. Make new backups if you create a new receiving address!
 
 
   
Boot with only 1 USB drive plugged in:
Make sure only the USB drive (with the swap partition and data partition) is plugged in when you boot up your Raspberry Pi. This to make sure the swap partition (/dev/sda1) is recognized correctly.   If you boot up with multiple USB drives, Lubuntu might see the USB drive with the swap partition as the second drive (instead of the first drive), and ignore the 2 GB swap partition. If this happens, starting Reddcoin can render the Raspberry Pi unresponsive.
   
Connection issues If you have issues syncing the blockchain because you have 0 network connections, please follow the instructions in this thread.
   
Start Reddcoin Core easier
Run a shell script (.sh file), so you can start Reddcoin just by double clicking on an icon on your Desktop.
   
Minimization options
Adjust minimization options, so you can safely press on the X button (the close/exit button on the upper right corner).
   
RealVNC VNC Viewer (client) and VNC Connect (server): To remote connect to the Raspberry Pi, I use VNC Viewer ad VNC Connect from RealVNC.
 
   
Chromium as browser: The updates break Firefox, the browser crashes when you try to run it. Install another browser, Chromium, to solve this issue.
   
Updates / Upgrades
If Software Updater shows up and tells you that there is updated software available, do not install the updates using Software Updater. Use LXTerminal to update Lubuntu.  
     

Credits:

   
Credits in previous tutorial:
submitted by Yavuz_Selim to reddCoin [link] [comments]

Dogecoin on Linux - The Complete Beginner's Guide

I'm writing this because I couldn't find a single condensed guide on compiling the wallet and running mining software on linux, specficially Ubuntu/Linux Mint. I combed Bitcoin and Litecoin forums for similar problems I was running into and eventually got everything nailed down, so here it is in one place, for new Shibes.
If you want to make a Dogecoin directory in your downloads folder to keep things organized, you will need to modify these commands to refelct the change. So instead of going to ~/Downloads/ you will need to go to ~/Downloads/Dogecoin and be sure to put the zipped files there when you download them, but the commands will be the same otherwise.
cwayne18 put in the work to make a PPA for the QT client here.
Ubunutu/Mint/Debian users should be able to install the client with the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:cwayne18/doge sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install dogecoin-qt 
To update using this method, run
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade dogecoin-qt 
Compiling the Wallet Manually
I suggest using the PPA above, but if you want to compile manually, here you go.
1)Download the newest source from here. If you want to check out the Github page, click here
2)Unzip the package with the native client OR, navigate to your downloads and unzip
cd ~/Downloads unzip dogecoin-master.zip 
3)Now it's time to compile. You will need to install the dependencies, just copy and paste the following code. It will be a fairly large download and could take some time. It is always important to update before installing any new software, so we'll do that first and then install the dependencies.
sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get install libssl-dev libdb-dev libdb++-dev libqrencode-dev qt4-qmake libqtgui4 libqt4-dev sudo apt-get install libminiupnpc-dev libminiupnpc8 libboost-all-dev build-essential git libboost1.53-all-dev 
4)Once that is done, go to the doge-coin master directory and compile:
cd ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste sed -i 's/-mgw46-mt-sd-1_53//g' dogecoin-qt.pro qmake USE_UPNP=- USE_QRCODE=0 USE_IPV6=0 make -j3 
After running the qmake command you will likely see some text similar to
Project MESSAGE: Building without UPNP support Project MESSAGE: Building with UPNP supportRemoved plural forms as the target language has less forms. If this sounds wrong, possibly the target language is not set or recognized. 
It's perfectly normal, so don't worry about that.
Your Dogewallet is ready to go! The executable is in ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste and called dogecoin-qt. Your wallet information is in ~/.dogecoin. You can run the wallet at any time by opening terminal and typing
cd ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste ./dogecoin-qt 
Future upgrades to dogewallet are easy. Back up your wallet.dat, and simply follow the same directions above, but you'll be unzipping and building the newer version. You will likely need to rename the old dogecoin-master directory in ~/Downloads before unzipping the newest version and building. Also, it is likely that you will not need to install the dependencies again.
Alternate Method For Installing Dogecoin Wallet from Nicebreakfast
After installing the dependencies listed in step 3, open terminal, then navigate to where you want Dogecoin Wallet stored and run:
git clone https://github.com/dogecoin/dogecoin ./autogen.sh ./configure make 
then when the wallet is updated just run
git pull 
from the dogecoin directory.
GPU Mining
GPU mining requires CGminer. My suggestion is to get the executable already built. The creator of cgminer has removed the built file from his website, but I've uploaded it here
sudo apt-get install pkg-config opencl-dev libcurl4-openssl-dev autoconf libtool automake m4 ncurses-dev cd ~/Downloads tar -xvf cgminer-3.7.2-x86_64-built.tar.bz2 
Don't use anything newer than 3.7.2. The newer versions of CGMiner don't support GPU mining.
That's it! You have cgminer ready to go! You will run cgminer with the following syntax
cd ~/Downloads/cgminer-3.7.2-x86_64-built/ ./cgminer --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://SERVERNAME:PORT -u WORKER.ID -p PASS 
A good guide for fine tuning cgminer can be found here; follow the litecoin example.
EDIT
I had trouble getting cgminer running with a single line command, but running it via an executable .sh file works. This is covered in the cgminer setup guide I posted above but I'll put it here too. In the same directory that has the cgminer executable, you need to make a file called cgminer.sh and make it executable. It should contain the follwing:
export GPU_USE_SYNC_OBJECTS=1 export GPU_MAX_ALLOC_PERCENT=100 export DISPLAY=:0 find *.bin -delete sleep 5 ./cgminer 
Then you can call cgminer in terminal by doing ./cgminer.sh You will need a cgminer.conf file containing all your options. All of this is covered in the guide that is linked above.
A quick note about AMD drivers: They used to be a huge PITA to install and get working, but the newest Catalyst drivers are great. There's a GUI installer, everything works out of the box, and there is a lot of documentation. You can download them here: AMD Catalyst 14.6 Beta Linux
CPU Mining
For CPU mining I use minerd because it doesn't require any work to get running, simply download it and get to work. Download the built file for your machine 32-bit or 64-bit, and then unzip it and you're ready to go!
cd ~/Downloads tar -xvf pooler-cpuminer-2.3.2-linux-x86.tar.gz 
The executable is called minerd and it will be in ~/Downloads but you can move it to wherever you like. To run it, pull up terminal and do
cd ~/Downloads minerd --url=stratum+tcp://SERVER:PORT --userpass=USERNAME.WORKERNAME:WORKERPASSWORD 
You're done! Happy mining!
Common Issues
I ran into this and I've seen others with this problem as well. Everything installs fine but there is a shared library file that isn't where it should be. In fact, it isn't there at all.
 libudev.so.1: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory 
In terminal, do
sudo updatedb locate libudev.so.0.13.0 
And it will probably return a path /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu. Inside that directory there's a library file called libudev.so.0.13.0. You'll need to make a symlink (aka shortcut) that links libudev.so.1 to libudev.so.0.13.0 So, assuming you're working with libudev.so.0.13.0 do this
cd /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu sudo ln -s libudev.so.0.13.0 libudev.so.1 
Now if you do
ln -l 
You should see
libudev.so.1 -> ./libudev.so.0.13.0 
Meaning you've made the symlink. Also, the text for libudev.so.1 will be blue.
submitted by Boozybrain to dogecoin [link] [comments]

How to Mine BiblePay on Linux

This guide is outdated, please refer to:
https://wiki.biblepay.org/POBH_Setup
https://wiki.biblepay.org/PODC_Setup
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IMPORTANT - Evolution Upgrade:
Quick Start https://wiki.biblepay.org/Quick_Start
Evolution Upgrade Information https://wiki.biblepay.org/Evolution_Upgrade
Getting Started with Evolution https://wiki.biblepay.org/Getting_Started_with_Evolution
Generic Smart Contracts https://wiki.biblepay.org/Generic_Smart_Contracts
What is BiblePay Evolution? https://www.reddit.com/BiblePay/comments/bifvpk/biblepay_evolution_what_is_it/
Recommend 2GB RAM or can get stuck compiling (if 1GB RAM can use Swap File) Use Ubuntu 16.04
INFO
https://github.com/biblepay/biblepay-evolution/blob/masteBuildBiblePay.txt
INSTALL COMMANDS
apt-get install build-essential libtool autotools-dev automake pkg-config libssl-dev libevent-dev bsdmainutils apt-get install libboost-system-dev libboost-filesystem-dev libboost-chrono-dev libboost-program-options-dev libboost-test-dev libboost-thread-dev apt-get install libqt5gui5 libqt5core5a libqt5dbus5 qttools5-dev qttools5-dev-tools libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler apt-get install git apt-get install curl build-essential libtool autotools-dev automake pkg-config python3 bsdmainutils cmake sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install libdb4.8-dev libdb4.8++-dev git clone http://github.com/biblepay/biblepay-evolution prefix=x86_64-pc-linux-gnu cd biblepay-evolution/depends make -j4 # Choose a good -j value, depending on the number of CPU cores available cd .. ./autogen.sh #Note: if echo `pwd` does not return your working directory, replace it with your working directory such as /biblepay-evolution/ ./configure --prefix `pwd`/depends/x86_64-pc-linux-gnu make # See more here: #https://github.com/biblepay/biblepay-evolution/blob/mastedoc/build-unix.md 

SWAP FILE
NOTE: if server is 1GB RAM, before running last command "sudo make", set up a swap file
free #check if swap is 0 dd if=/dev/zero of=/vaswap.img bs=1024k count=1000 mkswap /vaswap.img swapon /vaswap.img free #check if swap is 1024 sudo make 

RUN COMMAND LINE
cd src ./biblepayd -daemon 
OR
RUN GUI
Your GUI program will be located in: /biblepay-evolution/src/qt
./biblepay-qt 
You can also run it in the background (to free up your terminal) if you call it with:
./biblepay-qt & 
To start mining, instructions are the same as for Windows: Go to Tools -> Debug Console
Execute this command (to start mining with 8 threads)
setgenerate true 8 
From there you can use all other commands such as getmininginfo, getwalletinfo, etc. Execute help command to get the list of all available commands.
Note: GUI will be built automatically only if you meet the requirements for qt library, i.e. make sure you ran this line before compiling:
sudo apt-get install libqt5gui5 libqt5core5a libqt5dbus5 qttools5-dev qttools5-dev-tools libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler 
BIBLEPAY is now Running!

SETUP CONFIG
Stop BiblePay and set up the config file to get starting nodes to sync with and enable mining:
./biblepay-cli stop cd ~/.biblepayevolution/ vi biblepay.conf addnode=node.biblepay.org gen=1 genproclimit=1 
Escape Key + : (Colon Key) + w + q + Enter (saves file and quits)

addnode --- adds a node to the list of nodes to connect to gen=1 --- turns on mining genproclimit --- sets number of threads to use when mining

Run BiblePay again and fully sync with network
cd ../biblepay-evolution/src ./biblepayd -daemon ./biblepay-cli getinfo 

USEFUL COMMANDS
./biblepay-cli help ./biblepay-cli getaccountaddress "" ./biblepay-cli getinfo ./biblepay-cli getmininginfo ./biblepay-cli setgenerate true 8 ./biblepay-cli sendtoaddress "insertAddressHere" 777 "" "" true ./biblepay-cli stop ./biblepayd -daemon top #CPU usage q to quit 

MINING THREADS: To change number of threads to use up for mining
a. Edit home/yourusername/.biblepayevolution/biblepay.conf file:
genproclimit=X 
and restart BiblePay -or- b. Menu >> Tools >> Debug Console >> Type command:
setgenerate true X 
(Replace X with number of threads Use top command to view CPU usage)

POOL
NOTE: To use the pool you must now use the external miner, not the wallet miner https://whitewalr.us/2019/biblepay-nomp-pool-mining.html
  1. Set up an account on pool website: https://pool.biblepay.org/
  2. Create Worker Username(s) - Workers tab >>> Add
  3. Enable pool and add Worker Username in ~/.biblepayevolution/biblepay.conf file, add these lines and save:
    pool=https://pool.biblepay.org workerid=insertWorkerUsernameHere
4. Restart BiblePay
./biblepay-cli stop ./biblepayd -daemon 
Setup Auto-Withdraw Navigate to Account >>> Account Settings >>> Verify your BBP Receiving Address >>> Click Authorize-Auto-Withdraws

UPDATE:

### Turn off/stop BiblePay
cd /home/yourname/biblepay-evolution/src ./biblepay-cli stop 

### Pull down latest Biblepay code and build it
cd /home/yourname/biblepay-evolution git pull origin master sudo make 

### Turn BiblePay back on and check version number
cd src ./biblepayd -daemon ./biblepay-cli getinfo ./biblepay-cli setgenerate true 8 

UPDATE IN ONE COMMAND:
./biblepay-evolution/src/biblepay-cli stop ; cd && cd biblepay-evolution/ && git pull origin master && sudo make && cd src && ./biblepayd -daemon && sleep 90 && ./biblepay-cli getmininginfo 
Note: the ";" says do this after, regardless of the outcome Note: && says do this after only if previous command finished with no errors

SPEED UP COMPILE:
To speed up the compile time, add -j4 or -j8 after make. This way it compiles using 4 or 8 threads instead of just 1.
./configure LDFLAGS="-L${BDB_PREFIX}/lib/" CPPFLAGS="-I${BDB_PREFIX}/include/" sudo make -j8 
Reference: http://www.linux-databook.info/?page_id=2319

RSYNC stop biblepay from your nodes compile on your fastest machine then rsync with your machines only src folder is required
rsync -avuz /root/biblepay-evolution/src/ [email protected]:/root/biblepay-evolution/src/ 
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/3299951/how-to-pass-password-for-rsync-ssh-command https://www.thegeekstuff.com/2008/11/3-steps-to-perform-ssh-login-without-password-using-ssh-keygen-ssh-copy-id/
people make cron jobs and rsync automatically

OUTDATED

Unofficial Bash Script
https://gist.github.com/anonymous/d1c1d35e3c8f67f5fb2e204479fa5c6b

Official Ubuntu Package
https://launchpad.net/~biblepay-official

Unofficial Ubuntu Package
https://www.reddit.com/BiblePay/comments/7rwqqs/unofficial_ubuntu_packages_available/

Unofficial Mine in One Line
https://www.reddit.com/BiblePay/comments/7ryuk1/mine_in_one_line/
NOTE: DONT RUN ON A COMPUTER WITH COINS -- THIS IS A CLEAN INSTALL SCRIPT

COMPILE WITHOUT GUI: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2042657.msg21878317#msg21878317 https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2042657.msg21878389#msg21878389
ADVANCED:

DOCKER IMAGES (NOTE: I havent tested these, use at your own risk) https://hub.docker.com/gagaha/biblepay/ https://hub.docker.com/cryptozero/biblepay-opt/
submitted by togoshige to BiblePay [link] [comments]

[Reupload][Tutorial] Install Armory Wallet 0.96.4 on Fedora Workstation 29

note: I had to reupload this because reddit is banning my original account for no reason. I appealed but I thought maybe someone wanted to have this content online.
Armory is a very cool open source bitcoin wallet for the power user. You can do neat things with it, read here: https://www.bitcoinarmory.com/
Disclaimer: follow these steps at your own risk. I am not responsible for any damage / loss of funds you might face for following or not following correctly my instructions here. I may have made a typo somewhere or be wrong so do your own research and learn for yourself what I am doing at each step, and what consequences may have for you, at your own risk. These instructions may be wrong somewhere. It worked for me, it doesn't mean it has to work for you.
Requirements for this tutorial:
We are going to build the code from source.
Install dependencies.
I followed these instructions to find the equivalent Fedora packages:
Open the terminal app and run this command:
sudo dnf install git nano qt qt-devel python-devel libtool pyqt4 pyqt4-devel lmdb swig 
And more python packages that I had to install:
sudo pip install twisted qt4reactor psutil 
Importing the signing key to verify the software
Install KGPG to easily manage keys.
sudo dnf install kgpg 
Go to
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0x8C5211764922589A
and copy paste the code below the title from
-----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
to
-----END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
both included. Then open KGPG from terminal with
kgpg -k 
and click 'Import Key...' > Clipboard > Ok . You should see a confirmation message. Double check the info and close the dialog.
Repeat the process with this other key:
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0xA4FC919E85C595BA
You can verify both keys are mentioned at the Armory webpage.
Clone and compile the code plus some edits
Before, we installed some dependencies that are named differently than the equivalent Ubuntu/Debian package specified at the Armory documentation. The build process fails for Fedora as the name for the dependency during checks won't match the Fedora version. There's this pull request addressing that, but the code is not part of any release yet.
So the fastest workaround (maybe a bit dirty) was to edit the build config file and correct the name for my Fedora install. Let's begin.
Clone the Armory repository
git clone https://github.com/goatpig/BitcoinArmory.git 
Enter the BitcoinArmory dir
cd BitcoinArmory 
Switch to release code
git checkout 'v0.96.4' 
Verify commit signature
git tag -v 'v0.96.4' 
you should see the following message:
> object fee1f91a3137ef1056e15cc606a186b0e508f84c > type commit > tag v0.96.4 > tagger goatpig  1522530739 +0200 > > v0.96.4 > gpg: Signature made Sat 31 Mar 2018 11:12:19 PM CEST > gpg: using RSA key 8C5211764922589A > gpg: Good signature from "goatpig (Offline signing key for Armory releases) " > gpg: WARNING: This key is not certified with a trusted signature! > gpg: There is no indication that the signature belongs to the owner. > Primary key fingerprint: 745D 707F BA53 968B DF63 AA8D 8C52 1176 4922 589A 
if it looks the same, everything is ok.
Edit the file 'Makefile' file with
gedit Makefile 
And click the three dot menu > Find and Replace...
Configure the options as follows:
https://i.imgur.com/hpS01Kd.png
Click Replace All and close.
Go back to the terminal and run the following commands in order from inside the BitcoinArmory dir. Wait for the previous one to finish before running the next one:
./autogen.sh 
...
./configure 
...
make 
if everything finishes without error you are all done! Run this to start Armory:
python ./ArmoryQt.py 
you are all set. Please let me know if I missed something.
submitted by RedditShadowbangedMe to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Tutorial] Install Armory Wallet 0.96.4 on Fedora Workstation 29

Armory is a very cool open source bitcoin wallet for the power user. You can do neat things with it, read here: https://www.bitcoinarmory.com/
Disclaimer: follow these steps at your own risk. I am not responsible for any damage / loss of funds you might face for following or not following correctly my instructions here. I may have made a typo somewhere or be wrong so do your own research and learn for yourself what I am doing at each step, and what consequences may have for you, at your own risk. These instructions may be wrong somewhere. It worked for me, it doesn't mean it has to work for you.
Requirements for this tutorial:
We are going to build the code from source.
Install dependencies.
I followed these instructions to find the equivalent Fedora packages:
Open the terminal app and run this command:
sudo dnf install git nano qt qt-devel python-devel libtool pyqt4 pyqt4-devel lmdb swig 
And more python packages that I had to install:
sudo pip install twisted qt4reactor psutil 
Importing the signing key to verify the software
Install KGPG to easily manage keys.
sudo dnf install kgpg 
Go to
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0x8C5211764922589A
and copy paste the code below the title from
-----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
to
-----END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
both included. Then open KGPG from terminal with
kgpg -k 
and click 'Import Key...' > Clipboard > Ok . You should see a confirmation message. Double check the info and close the dialog.
Repeat the process with this other key:
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0xA4FC919E85C595BA
You can verify both keys are mentioned at the Armory webpage.
Clone and compile the code plus some edits
Before, we installed some dependencies that are named differently than the equivalent Ubuntu/Debian package specified at the Armory documentation. The build process fails for Fedora as the name for the dependency during checks won't match the Fedora version. There's this pull request addressing that, but the code is not part of any release yet.
So the fastest workaround (maybe a bit dirty) was to edit the build config file and correct the name for my Fedora install. Let's begin.
Clone the Armory repository
git clone https://github.com/goatpig/BitcoinArmory.git 
Enter the BitcoinArmory dir
cd BitcoinArmory 
Switch to release code
git checkout 'v0.96.4' 
Verify commit signature
git tag -v 'v0.96.4' 
you should see the following message:
> object fee1f91a3137ef1056e15cc606a186b0e508f84c > type commit > tag v0.96.4 > tagger goatpig  1522530739 +0200 > > v0.96.4 > gpg: Signature made Sat 31 Mar 2018 11:12:19 PM CEST > gpg: using RSA key 8C5211764922589A > gpg: Good signature from "goatpig (Offline signing key for Armory releases) " > gpg: WARNING: This key is not certified with a trusted signature! > gpg: There is no indication that the signature belongs to the owner. > Primary key fingerprint: 745D 707F BA53 968B DF63 AA8D 8C52 1176 4922 589A 
if it looks the same, everything is ok.
Edit the file 'Makefile' file with
gedit Makefile 
And click the three dot menu > Find and Replace...
Configure the options as follows:
https://i.imgur.com/hpS01Kd.png
Click Replace All and close.
Go back to the terminal and run the following commands in order from inside the BitcoinArmory dir. Wait for the previous one to finish before running the next one:
./autogen.sh 
...
./configure 
...
make 
if everything finishes without error you are all done! Run this to start Armory:
python ./ArmoryQt.py 
you are all set. Please let me know if I missed something.
edit: cd git dir.
submitted by AmbitiousSpeed0 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Lore v2 QT on Raspberry Pi

Hello,
 
To follow up to mindphuk's excellent piece on building the headless client on Raspberry Pi (https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6gkjrw/wip_blackpi_a_stake_device_based_on_raspberry/), I thought if anyone was interested I'd show you how to get the full QT version running on the Pi on the Jessie with Pixel desktop. This works and has been soak tested for several days now on a standard Raspberry Pi 3. I have since added some coins and it stakes a handful of times a day.
 
Running staking Lore clients paves the way for some of the future use cases of BLK utilising the Bitcoin 0.12 (and newer) core tech, including colored coins. So I'm going to leave this one going indefinitely to kickstart the number of Lore clients staking. It's certainly not mandatory but it will be good in the longer term to have a nice distribution of Lore staking clients.
 
The cross-compile which lets you create binaries for multiple platforms didn't work for the QT version on the Pi, so there is more to do than just running the binary unfortunately, as below. There are folks working on some much cleaner solutions than this for the Pi, with a custom front end, and where you won't have to do any mucking about. That is coming soon. In the meantime, if you enjoy a fiddle with such things, here's how to get this QT client working on your Pi.
 
These instructions assume you are starting from scratch with a completely blank OS.
 
Download Jessie with Pixel from: http://downloads.raspberrypi.org/raspbian/images/raspbian-2017-07-05/2017-07-05-raspbian-jessie.zip
 
Note they have since (August 2017) released a version called 'Stretch' which does not work with this guide. I'll see if I can come up with something new for that at some point and link to it here when I have. In the meantime the guide should work with the Jessie image above.
 
Unzip the file and extract the .img file to burn it onto Fresh SD card to boot from (to be safe, use 16GB or larger), using a tool like win32diskimager or Etcher.
 
Assuming you have keyboard/mouse and monitor plugged into your pi, boot it up and the Jessie Desktop will show.
 
Before we do anything else, you should increase the default swap size on the pi, as compiling certain libraries can exhaust the RAM and get stuck otherwise. To do this, launch a Terminal window and type:
 
sudo nano /etc/dphys-swapfile 
 
and Change the CONF_SWAPSIZE from 100 to:
 
CONF_SWAPSIZE=1024 
 
Exit nano with control + x to write out the file.
 
Then, run the following to restart the swapfile manager:
 
sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile stop sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile start 
 
Now, launch the browser and download the Lore 2.12 binaries for ARM here: https://mega.nz/#!k2InxZhb!iaLhUPreA7LZqZ-Az-0StRBUshSJ82XjldPsvhGBBH4 (Version with fee fix from 6 September 2017)
 
(If you prefer to compile it yourself instead, it is possible by following the instructions in the original article by Mindphuk just taking into account this is the newer version of the Lore client than when that was written (https://github.com/janko33bd/bitcoin/releases) and the versions of Boost and the Berkeley DB need to be the same as below.)
 
Double click the zip and extract the Lore binary files. Yes, at the moment they are all called 'bitcoin', not 'blackcoin' or 'Lore' - this is because the code derives from a recent bitcoin core implementation so this has not yet been updated. You can place these wherever you like.
 
In the Terminal window, change directory to where you put the binaries, e.g.:
 
cd Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel chmod +x * 
 
That marks the binaries as executable.
 
Now, we need the Boost libraries installed for any of the Lore binaries to work. The project was done with Boost 1.62.0. Unfortunately the Jessie repository only goes up to 1.55, so we need to download and build 1.62 manually on the device.
wget https://sourceforge.net/projects/boost/files/boost/1.62.0/boost_1_62_0.tar.gz/download tar -xvzf download cd boost_1_62_0 sudo ./bootstrap.sh sudo ./b2 install 
 
(This will take almost 2 hours. Have a nice cup of tea and a sit down.)
 
When I came to run the binaries, I found they couldn't find Boost. Running this command fixes that:
sudo ldconfig 
 
Now we are going to install the packages which aren't already included in the default OS installation which the binaries need in order to run:
sudo apt-get install qrencode libprotobuf-dev libevent-pthreads-2.0-5 
 
Now we need to install the Berkeley Database version 6.2.23. This is the version Lore v2 uses. Bitcoin still uses 4.8 which is 10 years old! This doesn't take too long.
wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-6.2.23.tar.gz tar -xvzf db-6.2.23.tar.gz cd db-6.2.23/build_unix ../dist/configure --prefix=/usr --enable-compat185 --enable-dbm --disable-static --enable-cxx 
 
I find this next section of the Berkeley instructions worked better just switching to root, which can be fudged by running sudo su before the rest:
sudo su make make docdir=/usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 install chown -v -R root:root /usbin/db_* /usinclude/db{,_185,_cxx}.h /uslib/libdb*.{so,la} /usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 
 
Now we're going to go up a couple of directories to where the binaries were:
cd ../.. 
 
Then run the client!
./bitcoin-qt 
 
And there you have it. Should hopefully end up looking a bit like this: http://imgur.com/a/eEHGa
 
Using the Bootstrap can save a while syncing. Download it at: https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6b3imq/blackcoin_bootstrapdat_up_to_block_1631800
 
Place the bootstrap.dat file into the ~/.lore directory.
 
Run ./bitcoin-qt again, it will say 'Importing Blocks' rather than 'Synchronising with Network'. My pi sync'ed fully in about 5-6 hours.
 
If you want peace of mind that Lore will always start on bootup into the Jessie w/Pixel desktop (i.e. after a power cycle), then you need to create a .desktop file in the following place.
sudo nano ~/.config/autostart/Lore.desktop 
 
And in it, enter the following (tailoring the Exec line below to the whereabouts of your bitcoin-qt file):
[Desktop Entry] Name=Blackcoin Lore Comment=Mining without the waste Exec=/home/pi/Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel/bitcoin-qt Type=Application Encoding=UTF-8 Terminal=false Categories=None; 
 
Power usage and payback time
 
After a good while leaving it going by itself, the CPU load averages got down to almost zero, all of the time. Idling, the Pi uses a bit less than 3 watts. This means it would take two weeks to use one 1Kw/h of electricity.
 
If you pay e.g. 12.5 cents a unit, that's what you'd expect this to cost to run in a fortnight. That's around $0.25 a month or $3 a year. Green and cheap and helping to secure the BLK network. I paid for the year's worth of electricity in 2 days staking with 25k BLK. Makes mining look silly, huh? ;)
 
Securing your Pi
 
With staking, your wallet needs to be unlocked and as such, the keys to your wallet are on the device. In a clean and newly installed environment as described above, and if you don't allow others to use your device and there is no other software or nasties running on it, there is no real cause for concern. However, there are some basic security precautions you can take.
 
Firstly, if you have enabled SSH and are playing with your pi across your LAN (or worse, the Internet), you should immediately change the password for the default 'pi' user (which is preconfigured to be 'raspberry'). Simply log in as normal, then type:
 
passwd 
 
You'll be prompted to enter the old and the new passwords.
 
Security by default
 
Your Pi is likely, by default, to not be exposed to incoming connections from the outside world because your router is likely generating a private address range for your LAN (192.168.x.x or 10.0.x.x or 172.x.x.x) which means all incoming connections are effectively blocked at the router anyway unless you set up a 'port forward' record to allow packets arriving on certain ports to be forwarded to a specific internal IP address.
 
As for accessing your Pi across the internet, if you have set up a port forward, this likely has security ramifications. Even basic old fashioned protocols have proven in recent times to have uncaught flaws, so it's always advisable to lock down your device as much as possible, and even if you only plan to access the Pi over your LAN, install a firewall to configure this. I used one called ufw, because it's literally an uncomplicated firewall.
 
sudo apt-get install ufw sudo ufw allow from 192.168.0.0/16 to any port 22 sudo ufw --force enable 
 
This allows just port 22 (SSH) to be open on the Pi to any device on my LAN's subnet (192.168.0.x). You can change the above to a single IP address if paranoid, or add several lines, if you want to lock it down to your LAN and a specific external static IP address (e.g. a VPN service you use). To find out what subnet your router uses, just type:
 
ifconfig 
 
and you'll see on the interface you are using (either hard wired or wifi) the 192.168 or 10. or 172. prefix. Change the above rule so it matches the first two octets correctly (e.g. 10.0.0.0/16 if you're on a 10.0. address).
 
You may already use VNC to access your Pi's desktop across your LAN, this uses port 5900. Add a line like above to lock it down to an internal address. It's not a good idea to expose this port to the wider world because those connections are not encrypted and potentially could be subjected to a MITM attack.
 
You can query the status of the firewall like this:
ufw status 
 
And of course, try connecting remotely once you change the rules to see what works. You should consult the official documentation for further options: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UFW
 
Back up & Recovery
 
There are again many ways to tackle this so I'll just speak about my basic precautions in this regard. Don't take it as a be-all-and-end-all!
 
The wallet.dat file is the key file (literally) containing all the private/public keys and transactions. This can be found in:
 
~/.lore 
 
You can navigate there using Jessie w/Pixel's own file manager or in a terminal window (cd ~/.lore). You can copy this file or, if you'd rather keep a plain text file of all your public and private keys, use the 'dumpwallet' command in the console. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'dumpwallet myfilename' where myfilename is the file you want it to spit out with all your keys in it. This file will end up in the same place you launch bitcoin-qt from.
 
The instructions earlier on, when running Lore for the first time intentionally left out encrypting your wallet.dat file because in order for the wallet to stake upon startup, it needs to have a decrypted key already. This isn't perfect, but after a power cycle, it would never stake unless you left it decrypted. So the best practice here is as soon as the wallet.dat file has left your device, i.e. you copy it to a USB stick for example, put it in an encrypted folder or drive (or both).
 
In Windows, one way is to use Bitlocker drive encryption for the entire drive. You should follow the instructions here to encrypt your flash drive before your wallet.dat is on there, and don't forget the password!!
http://infosec.nmsu.edu/instructions-guides/how-to-enable-bitlocker-to-go-for-external-hard-drives-and-usb-flash-drives/
 
On the Mac, I use a software package called Concealer to encrypt files I store on the Mac itself: http://www.belightsoft.com/products/conceale   There are almost certainly free packages with similar functionality, I have just used that one for years.
 
Either way, if you want to just make sure your USB drive is encrypted, you can do so in one-click in Finder before you put the sensitive files on it: http://lifehacker.com/encrypt-a-usb-stick-in-finder-with-a-click-1594798016
 
Note that these disk encryption methods may mean having to access the USB stick on a PC or Mac in order to retrieve the files in the event of a disaster. Be aware this may mean exposing them to more security issues if your computer is in any way compromised or someone nefarious has access to your computer. There are more 'manual' ways of backing up and recovering, such as literally writing down private/public key pairs which this guide doesn't go into, but may suit you better if paranoid about your setup.
 
Recovery
 
The wallet.dat file has everything in it you need to recover your wallet, or if you used 'dumpwallet', the file you saved out has all the keys.
 
Wallet.dat method: Install Lore as normal then replace any auto-generated wallet.dat in ~/.lore directory with your backup. If a lot of time has elapsed and many transactions have occurred since your backup, launch lore with:
./bitcoin-qt -rescan 
 
And if that doesn't do the job, do a full reindex of the blockchain:
 
./bitcoin-qt -reindex 
 
If you used the dumpwallet command, install Lore then place the file containing all the keys that you saved out in the same directory as bitcoin-qt. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'importwallet myfilename' where myfilename is that file containing all the keys. The wallet should automatically rescan for transactions at that point and you should be good to go.
 
There are a million ways to do effective security and disaster recovery, but I hope this shows you a couple of basic precautionary ways. There are discussions about better ways to stake without compromising too much security which are happening all the time and developments in this regard will happen in time.
 
In the meantime, feel free to comment with your best practices.
 
submitted by patcrypt to blackcoin [link] [comments]

Colored coin client preview #1 (based on Bitcoin Armory)

I think it's already good enough for people to play with it. (Although certainly it's not ready for anything serious.)
For people who are not familiar with concept, colored coins is a technology which allows people to represent arbitrary tokens (e.g. issue private currencies, stocks, bonds, etc.) using small quantities of bitcoins. It is interesting because it would allow us to create decentralized and secure markets. (As decentralized and secure as Bitcoin itself, at least in theory.) See here.
Notes about current release:
Windows binaries: http://killerstorm.xen.prgmr.com/alex/ArmoryX-0.2.5.zip
There are no Linux binaries, but it's really easy to build it on Ubuntu or Debian:
(Note: if you're already using Armory, it is a good idea to hide you ~/.armory so it won't be seen by this experimental Armory mod. Or, perhaps, just don't run this experimental mod.)
Before you run it, make sure that bitcoind or Bitcoin-Qt is running and fully sync'ed. Armory takes up to 10 minutes to start (this version is slower because it additionally scans for colored transactions) and requires ~ 1 GB of RAM.
At start it will offer to create a wallet, do not enable encryption, otherwise issuing colored coins won't work.
Send some bitcoins to this new wallet, 0.02 BTC is probably enough to issue some colored coins and to pay for tx fees.
There is a drop down to choose color. Balance is displayed for a currently chosen color (i.e. if you chose TESTcc it will show how many TESTcc units this wallet owns), and when you send coins you send coins of that color.
Initially 'uncolored' is selected, it means normal BTC. This drop down also has TESTcc ("test colored coins") and "All colors" (this mode is just for debugging, you cannot send coins in this mode).
Here's what you can do now:
  1. Ask somebody to send you TESTcc. (We want to make it automatic, Satoshi Dice style, but unfortunately that code isn't quite ready.)
  2. Find and install other color definitions.
  3. Issue your own colored coins and send them to somebody who wants them. (LOL.)
Let's start from option #3. There is 'Hallucinate' menu. (It is called 'hallucinate' because colors do not exist on blockchain level, it is a client-side convention.) Choose 'Issue colored coins'. Likely all you need to change is name, but you can tweak satoshi-per-unit and number of units if you want.
When you click Issue it will create a new transaction (using your uncolored BTC) and will create a color definition. Optionally it will also upload your color definition to color definition registry. (This registry runs on my server, it might be down.)
You should note ColorID, this is how other people can refer to these coins (name is ambiguous).
You can now choose this new color in drop down and it will show your balance. (E.g. 1000 units.)
Now you'll perhaps want to send these coins to somebody. That person would need to install your color definition first. If you send colored coins without warning they might be lost, i.e. mixed with uncolored ones. For same reason it makes no sense to send them to wallet which isn't color aware.
For example, you can post on some forum:
I've issued LOLwut coins (ColorID: 36738fe78a443656535503efb585fee140a37d54), each unit represents a bond with face value of 0.1 BTC payable by me, Trololo, via buy back. I promise to buy back all bonds in a month.
Now people who are interested in this LOLwut coin issue will copy ColorID, paste it into Hallucinate > Download color definition dialog, and if this color definition is published it will be downloaded and installed. Armory restart is required to complete installation.
After installation that person will be able to see these LOLwut coins.
Note that if you do not trust my registration server, you can publish color definition yourself: go to ~/.armory/colordefs, find 36738fe78a443656535503efb585fee140a37d54.colordef and upload it to your web server. Then you can give people URL like http://example.com/36738fe78a443656535503efb585fee140a37d54.colordef and they can download it by URL.
Or they can just obtain this file by any means and copy it to ~/.armory/colordefs directory. It is decentralized, nobody can prevent you from issuing colored coins.
I think that's all. There is also Hallucinate > Manage color definitions dialog, but I hope it's easy to figure out how it works.
We are working on improved version, particularly on p2p exchange feature.
I've set up an IRC channel for people to talk about trying out colored coins: #colored-coins-otc on Freenode.
submitted by killerstorm to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Going to increase block size 1MB per year (by hand) in Bitcoin QT on my full bitcoin node starting 01 jan 2016.

I'm already running bitcoin-qt with the new block size (=block size limit) without relaying (port closed) on a different computer, with:
minrelaytxfee=0.0001
limitfreerelay=0
Block size=block size limit=max block size: largest block that will be excepted by a full bitcoin node.
The current solution to the block size problem tries to solve the problem forever including looking into the far future and this is wrong for such a complicated issue. What we should strive for is a MINIMAL solution that nevertheless implements a forever increasing block size. The only drawback will be that we will need a final hard fork let's say 5 years from now. Because an exponential increase is too slow for a short term solution it should be a linear increasing block size, a final solution can be something exponential.
So again I'm proposing the 1MB per year block size increase as the temporary compromise minimal solution and we should implement it as soon as possible:
1 jan 2016: 2 MB
1 jan 2017: 3 MB
1 jan 2018: 4 MB
1 jan 2019: 5 MB
1 jan 2020: 6 MB
Etc.
Compiled bitcoin core (changing the max block size by hand every year) like this on Ubuntu Linux:
Change /home/user EVERYWHERE into where you want to install Bitcoin Core.
The hardest part: you need to install Berkeley db 4.8
cd /home/user
wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz
echo '12edc0df75bf9abd7f82f821795bcee50f42cb2e5f76a6a281b85732798364ef db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz' | sha256sum -c
tar -xvf db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz
cd db-4.8.30.NC/build_unix
mkdir -p build
../dist/configure --disable-shared --enable-cxx --with-pic --prefix=/home/usedb-4.8.30.NC/build_unix/build
make install
cd /home/user
wget https://bitcoin.org/bin/bitcoin-core-0.11.0/bitcoin-0.11.0.tar.gz
tar -xvf bitcoin-0.11.0.tar.gz
cd /home/usebitcoin-0.11.0/src/consensus
Use your favorite editor to change block size or execute the line below:
mv consensus.h consensus.h_back ; sed s/"MAX_BLOCK_SIZE = 1000000"/"MAX_BLOCK_SIZE = 2000000"/ consensus.h_back > consensus.h
cd /home/usebitcoin-0.11.0
./configure CPPFLAGS="-I/home/usedb-4.8.30.NC/build_unix/build/include/ -O2" LDFLAGS="-L/home/usedb-4.8.30.NC/build_unix/build/lib/" --with-gui
make
bitcoind in bitcoin-0.11.0/src, bitcoin-qt in bitcoin-0.11.0/src/qt (or execute sudo make install)
submitted by sumBTC to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Dash: QT Wallet Installation Guide - Linux = G15E01 How to Install Electrum Bitcoin Wallet on Ubuntu 16.04 How to Install Bitcoin Core Wallet on Ubuntu 16 Ubuntu -1 Setting up Bitcoin Get Bitcoin Wallet In Linux Mint ( Ubuntu ), No Installation Required

I will be running my Ubuntu instance on AWS though you can follow the same instructions anywhere on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. Please make sure your server has at least 4 GB of RAM. I am assuming the username is “ubuntu” (without double quotes) but if your username is something else like root, mark, etc. then please replace ubuntu accordingly. sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get install build-essential libtool autotools-dev autoconf autogen gcc g++ pkg-config libssl-dev openssl sudo apt-get install libdb++-dev libboost-all-dev sudo apt-get install libqt5gui5 libqt5core5 libqt5dbus5 qttools5-dev qttools5-dev-tools libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler sudo apt-get install libqrencode-dev sudo apt-get install Bitcoin Core is a community-driven free software project, released under the MIT license. Verify release signatures Download torrent Source code Show version history. Bitcoin Core Release Signing Keys v0.8.6 - 0.9.2.1 v0.9.3 - 0.10.2 v0.11.0+ Or choose your operating system. Windows exe - zip. To install Ubuntu without CD/DVD or USB pendrive, follow these steps: Download Unetbootin from here. Run Unetbootin. Now, from the drop-down menu under Type: select Hard Disk. Next select the Diskimage. Browse to the directory where you downloaded the iso file of Ubuntu. Press OK. Next when you reboot, you will get a menu like this: Since Bitcoin-Qt is run by the majority of the nodes, it is well-maintained, thoroughly tested and reviewed, and has fool-proof security. Though the functionalities are more basic when compared to Armory or MultiBit. To install the latest stable version of Bitcoin-Qt (0.8.6 ie.) in Ubuntu, you need to add the following PPA.

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Dash: QT Wallet Installation Guide - Linux = G15E01

This video covers the method to install BitCoins on Ubuntu 16.04 Bitcoin is a virtual and crypto-currency created by Satoshi Nakamoto. For more explanation on this video: https://www.linuxhelp.com ... How to install Bitcoin on Ubuntu 16.04 On this video, I will show you how to install Bitcoin on Ubuntu 16.04 Commands sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update “sudo apt ... Ubuntu -1 Setting up Bitcoin Commands, sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt sudo apt-get install bitcoind sudo blkid sudo nano /etc/fstab ... To add the PPA and install Bitcoin open a terminal window (press Ctrl+Alt+T) and copy+paste the following lines: sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin -y sudo apt update && sudo apt install ... install qt creator ubuntu command line ubuntu install bitcoin qt install qt sdk ubuntu install qt 5.2 ubuntu install litecoin qt ubuntu install qt 4.7 ubuntu install phonon qt ubuntu uninstall qt ...

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